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Multifunctional RNA Nanoparticles as Cancer and HIV Therapeutics

The promise of RNA interference based therapeutics is made evident by the recent surge of biotechnological drug companies that pursue such therapies and their progression into human clinical trials. The present technology discloses novel RNA  and RNA/DNA nanoparticles including multiple siRNAs, RNA aptamers, fluorescent dyes, and proteins. The National Cancer Institute sees parties interested licensing this technology  or in collaborative research to co-develop RNAi-based nanoparticle therapeutics for cancer and HIV.

Treating JC Polyomavirus Infection and Associated Leukoencephalopathy

The National Cancer Institute seeks parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop or license methods of treating disorders related to polyomavirus, as well as vaccines for patients undergoing immunosuppressive treatment such as multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, B cell cancers, and Crohn’s disease.

Mouse Xenograft Model for Mesothelioma

The National Cancer Institute is seeking parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop, evaluate, or commercialize a new mouse model for monoclonal antibodies and immunoconjugates that target malignant mesotheliomas. Applications of the technology include models for screening compounds as potential therapeutics for mesothelioma and for studying the pathology of mesothelioma.

Efficient Cell-Free Production of Papillomavirus Gene Transfer Vectors

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed cell free methods for efficiently producing high titer, papillomavirus virus-based gene transfer vectors. These vectors can potentially be used for vaccines and/or cancer therapeutic applications. NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for further development of these vectors.

Modulating Chemotherapeutic Cytotoxicity

The NCI seeks partners interested in in-licensing or co-development collaboration on CD47-targeting therapeutics for cardioprotection and autophagy modulation.

Novel Anti-HIV Proteins from Coral Reefs

Scientists at the National Cancer Institute's Molecular Targets Laboratory have discovered that Cnidarins as a novel class of highly potent proteins capable of blocking the HIV virus from penetrating T-cells. The National Cancer Institute seeks parties interested in collaborative research to license or co-develop large-scale recombinant production of cnidarins.

Topical Antibiotic for Faster Wound Healing

Currently available topical antibiotic formulations effectively eliminate bacteria at a wound site. Eliminating bacteria in the wound also eliminates the molecular signals present in bacterial DNA that stimulate the immune system's wound healing processes. Without these signals, the rate of wound healing is diminished.  The National Cancer Institute Laboratory of Experimental Immunology seeks parties interested in licensing a topical antibiotic formulation to accelerate wound healing.

Tissue Clamp for Repeated Opening and Closure of Incisions/Wounds

This surgical clamp device is particularly useful for intraocular surgeries requiring incision in the sclera. The device provides ease of use for repeated opening and closure of an incision or wound for entry of instruments into the eye. It maintains precise alignment of the wound margins, reducing loss of intraocular fluid and pressure. The NEI seeks licensees or collaborative co-development of this invention so that it can be commercialized.

Synthetic lipopeptide inhibitors of RAS oncoproteins

It is well known that overactive Ras signaling is linked to many forms of cancer, and despite intensive efforts worldwide to develop effective inhibitors of Ras, to date there is no anti-Ras inhibitor in clinical use. Researchers at the NCI’s Cancer and Inflammation Program, in collaboration with scientists at Vanderbilt University and the University of Illinois in Chicago, have identified a number of small peptidomimetic compounds that bind to Ras proteins with nanomolar affinity. NCI’s Cancer and Inflammation Program seeks partners interested in licensing or co-development of synthetic, highly potent cell-permeable inhibitors of Ras that bind to the protein directly.

A peptide hydrogel for use in vascular anastomosis

Surgery specialists from Johns Hopkins University, in collaboration with researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), developed peptide hydrogel compositions and methods to suture blood vessels during microsurgery. The hydrogels particularly benefit surgeons in whole tissue transplant procedures. The NCI seeks co-development research collaborations for further development of this technology.

Anti-bacterial Treatments Using Peptide-Based Inhibitors of the STAT3-IL10 Pathway

Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious disease that typically affects the lungs. Current therapies include a panel of antibiotics given over a range of 6-9 months. As a result of the expense of treatment, the extended timeframe needed for effective treatment, and the scarcity of medicines in some developing countries, patient compliance with TB treatment is very low and results in multi-drug resistant TB (MDR-TB). There remains a need for a faster, more effective treatment for TB. NCI researchers seek licensing and/or co-development of peptide inhibitors of STAT3 and IL-10 developed to treat bacterial infections such as tuberculosis. See aslo: NIH inventions E-164-2007 and E-167-2010

Assays for Measuring and Quantifying DNA Damage

The National Cancer Institute seeks partners interested in licensing or co-development of assays for determining the levels of gamma-H2AX/H2AX to measure and quantify DNA damage.

Cell Lines Expressing Nuclear and/or Mitochondrial RNAse H1

The National Institute of Child Health & Human Development (NICHD), Program in Genomics of Differentiation, seeks interested parties to further co-develop small molecule inhibitors of RNase H1, especially in regards to genome instability, transcription, and translation.

A New Class of Stable Heptamethine Cyanine Fluorophores and Biomedical Applications Thereof

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed an improved class of heptamethine cyanine fluorophore dyes useful for imaging applications in the near-IR range (750-850 nm). A new chemical reaction has been developed that provides easy access to novel molecules with improved properties. Specifically, the dyes display greater resistance to thiol nucleophiles, and are more robust while maintaining excellent optical properties. The dyes have been successfully employed in various in vivo imaging applications and in vitro labeling and microscopy applications. The NCI seek co-development or licensees to develop them as targetable agents for optical-guided surgical interventions.

Transformation of Weak or Non-Immunogenic Antigens to Produce an Immune Response and Therapeutic Polypeptides for the Treatment and Prevention of Cancer

Researchers at the National Institute on Aging (NIA) have developed a novel strategy for rendering weakly or non-immunogenic, shared (between self and tumor) antigens immunogenic, or able to produce an immune response. Further, they have created therapeutic polypeptides comprising tumor-associated embryonic antigens and chemoattractant ligands. Cancers targeted by these developments include breast, renal, lung, ovarian, and hematological cancers.

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