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Human Antibodies Against Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus

The National Cancer Institute is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop antibody-based therapeutic against MERS-CoV, including animal studies, cGMP manufacturing, and clinical trials.

Dual-Function Protein ATIA for Diagnostics and Therapeutics of Glioblastoma

Investigators at the NCI discovered an Anti-TNF Induced Apoptosis (ATIA) protein, which protects cells against apoptosis.  ATIA is highly expressed in glioblastoma and astrocytomas and its inhibition results in increased cell sensitivity to TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand induced cell death.  The National Cancer Institute seeks parties interested in licensing or collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize glioblastoma diagnostics and therapeutics.

A Triple Combination HIV Microbicide

Three anti-HIV proteins- the antiviral lectin cyanovirin, the antiviral lectin griffithsin, and the monoclonal antibody 2G12- have been successfully expressed in the same rice seed. The co-expression allows for a low cost, stable production method for a triple anti-HIV microbicide for the prevention of HIV. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks licensees for the invention microbicide and production method.

Sensitizing Cancer Cells to DNA Targeted Therapies

Chk2 is a protein kinase activated in response to DNA double strand breaks. In normal tissues, Chk2 phosphorylates and thereby activates substrates that induce programmed cell death, or apoptosis, via interactions with p53, E2F1, PML proteins. In cancer tissues, where apoptosis is suppressed, Chk2 phosphorylates and inactivates cell cycle checkpoints (via interactions with Cdc25, phosphatases and Brca1 proteins), which allows cancer cells to repair and tolerate DNA damage. Hence, Chk2 inhibitors would be expected to protect normal tissues by reducing apoptosis, and to sensitize cancer cells to DNA-targeted agents. The National Cancer Institute seeks licensees for small molecule inhibitors of Chk2 for the treatment of cancer.

Single domain CD4, HIV-1 Antibodies, and Fusion Proteins for treatment of HIV

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed single domain human CD4 proteins to inhibit HIV-1 entry and improved human domain antibodies against HIV-1. Fusion proteins comprising the single domain CD4 and HIV-1 antibody can be used to effectively neutralize HIV-1 in vitro. Researchers seek licensing for development of these antibody-based therapeutics for the treatment of HIV-1.

Treating Vascular Disease, Injury, and Inflammation

The Laboratory of Cardiovascular Sciences of the National Institute on Aging, is seeking parties interested in licensing or collaborative research to co-develop a cell surface protein observed to reduce inflammation and related injuries. In vivo and in vitro data are available.

Highly Soluble Pyrimido-Dione-Quinoline Compounds: Small Molecules that Stabilize and Activate p53 in Transformed Cells

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed an invention reporting the composition and function of a pyrimido-dione-quinoline that was found to inhibit HDM2’s ubiquitin ligase (E3) activity without accompanying genotoxicity. The current invention results in the stabilization of p53 in cells through the inhibition of its ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation resulting in a robust p53 response in tumors. NCI researchers seek licensing and/or co-development partners for this invention.

High Affinity Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting Glypican-2 for Treating Childhood Cancers

Cancer therapies that specifically target Glypican 2 (GPC2) are strong therapeutic candidates for pediatric patients with neuroblastoma and other GPC2 expressing cancers. The inventors at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed and isolated two new antibodies that target GPC2 (CT3 and CT5) that are available for licensing and co-development.

Bicistronic Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) Constructs Targeting CD19 and CD20

Chimeric Antigen Receptors (CARs) are engineered proteins that can be used in a therapeutic capacity when expressed by an immune cell (e.g., a T cell). Specifically, CARs comprise a targeting domain (such as an antibody or binding fragment thereof) as well as domains that activate immune cells. By selecting a targeting domain that binds to a protein that is selectively expressed on a cancer cell, it is possible to target immune cells to the cancer cells. Upon binding to the target cell, the immune cells are activated, leading to the destruction of the cancer cell. This therapeutic approach holds great promise, as evidenced by the recent FDA-approval of CAR-T cell therapies, KYMRIAH and YESCARTA, both of which target CD19.

Novel Small Molecule Antagonists Targeting Metastasis-Associated Lung Adenocarcinoma Transcript 1 (MALAT1) Long Non-coding RNA (lncRNA) as Anticancer Agents

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed an invention describing compounds that bind and alter the nuclear copy number of a long non-coding RNA (lncRNA), metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1), with the proposed consequence of inducing slower tumor growth and a reduction in metastasis. The NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for novel small molecule antagonists targeting MALAT1 lncRNA as anticancer agents.

Novel Small Molecules that Inhibit Hepatitis B Virus Replication by Targeting Packaging of Pre-genomic RNA

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed an invention describing novel small molecule agonists of a previously unidentified hepatitis B virus (HBV) RNA packaging signal (pgRNA) as promising therapeutic strategies for HBV infections, either alone or in combination with other antiviral agents. The NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for these novel small molecules that inhibit hepatitis B virus replication by targeting pre-genomic RNA.

Chimeric Antigen Receptors to CD276 for Treating Cancer

This licensing opportunity from the National Cancer Institute concerns the development of CARs comprising an antigen-binding fragment derived from the MGA271 antibody. The resulting CARs can be used in adoptive cell therapy treatment for neuroblastoma and other tumors that express CD276.

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