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Extremely Rapid Method to Isolate Neoantigen Reactive T Cell Receptors (TCRs)

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a novel method for identifying neoantigen reactive T cells and T cell receptors (TCRs), isolated from fresh tumors of common epithelial cancers. This highly specific and sensitive method allows rapid determination of the neoantigen reactive TCR sequences and can be very useful to translate this information into TCR-engineered T-cell populations for immunotherapy without the need to grow tumor infiltrating T-cells and expensive, time-consuming screening. The NCI seeks research co-development partners and/or licensees for this invention.

Method and System of Building Hospital-Scale Medical Image Database

Hospital Picture Archiving and Communication Systems (PACS) contain vast amounts of underutilized informatics about disease conditions. As computer image processing and systems advance, PACS informatics may form the foundation for precision automated computer-aided diagnostics for a wide range of disease conditions. Development of such systems may improve diagnostic accuracy and better inform treatment, but creating systems and algorithms capable of “learning” to recognize and locate the image patterns of disease and associated labels is a difficult problem. Researchers at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (NIHCC) have developed a technology that applies deep learning to PACS images to produce a database where certain disease features are identified and spatially located. Researchers at the NIHCC seek licensing of the PACS.

Brain endothelial reporter cells

The National Cancer Institute seeks parties interested in co-development of safe and effective TEM5 agonists and/or antagonists that modulate WNT signaling.

Anti-Viral Compounds that Inhibit HIV Activity

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Molecular Targets Laboratory is seeking parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop antiviral tropolone derivatives developed by systematic medicinal chemistry on the lead series.

Immunogenic Antigen Selective Cancer Immunotherapy

Researchers at the National Institute on Aging working on cancer immunotherapy and detection report the use of SPANX-B polypeptides in the treatment and identification of cancer. Specific human malignancies targeted for the treatments disclosed include melanoma and lung, colon, renal, ovarian and breast carcinomas. The NIA seeks parties interested in licensing or collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize SPANX-B polypeptides in the treatment and identification of cancer.

Reprogrammed Tumor Infiltrated Lymphocytes for Efficient Identification of Tumor-Antigen Specific T-Cell Receptors

Adoptive T Cell Therapy (ACT) has proven to effectively treat established tumors. This treatment consists of harvesting Tumor Infiltrated Lymphocytes (TIL) which specifically recognize cancer, expanding the tumor-specific TIL in vitro, and then reinfusing these cells into the patient for treatment. Both these lymphocytes and their T cell receptors (TCR) are valuable for cancer immunotherapy. Inventors from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed an improved method to identify tumor-specific TCRs by reprogramming TIL into stem cells. This invention is available to license further development.

Peptide Mimetic Ligands of Polo-like Kinase 1 Polo Box Domain

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed peptidomimetic inhibitors that disrupt Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1)-mediated protein interactions by targeting polo-box domain (PBD). The compounds are designed to selectively cause mitotic arrest in cancer cells with abnormal Plk1 expression. Researchers seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations to further develop the inhibitors.

Devices for Improved Tissue Cryopreservation and Recovery

Researchers at the National Eye Institute (NEI), have developed a cryopreservation and cell recovery system designed specifically for the efficient cryopreservation, transportation and subsequent thawing of monolayers and tissues on a substrate. This closed cryopreservation/defrost system allows for sterility in addition to increased viability, recovery and safety of tissues that can be used for in vitro culture or surgical transplantation.

Synthetic Bacterial Nanoparticles as Drug and Vaccine Delivery Vehicles

Engineered bacterial spores can provide many useful functions such as the treatment of infections, use as an adjuvant for the delivery of vaccines, and the enzymatic degradation of environmental pollutants. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute’s Laboratory of Molecular Biology have developed a novel, synthetic spore husk-encased lipid bilayer (SSHEL) particle that is uniquely suited for a variety of these functions. NCI seeks partners to license and/or co-develop this technology toward commercialization.

Method of Neoantigen-Reactive T Cell Receptor (TCR) Isolation from Peripheral Blood of Cancer Patients

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks research co-development partners and/or licensees for a novel method for isolation and construction of neoantigen-reactive T-cell receptors (TCRs) from peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) of cancer patients. This method generates accurate scoring of single T cells from tumors, as well as facilitates identification and reconstruction of unknown TCRs for immunotherapy.

Single domain CD4, HIV-1 Antibodies, and Fusion Proteins for treatment of HIV

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed single domain human CD4 proteins to inhibit HIV-1 entry and improved human domain antibodies against HIV-1. Fusion proteins comprising the single domain CD4 and HIV-1 antibody can be used to effectively neutralize HIV-1 in vitro. Researchers seek licensing for development of these antibody-based therapeutics for the treatment of HIV-1.

EGFRvIII Antibodies for the Treatment of Human Cancer

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have isolated seven monoclonal antibodies that bind to the human epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII) but not wildtype EGFR. The NCI seeks research co-development partners or licensees for monoclonal antibodies that specifically target cancer-expressed EGFR.

Software for Accurate Segmentation of Cell Nuclei in Breast Tissue

The Office of the Director, National Cancer Institute is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research (using the Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) or Material Transfer Agreement (MTA) to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize the software for accurate segmentation of cell nuclei and FISH signals in tissue sections. Collaborators working in the field of quantitative and automated pathology may be interested.

Anti-Py1235-Met Immunological Binding Reagent as Cancer Diagnostic

This technology consists of highly specific rabbit monoclonal antibodies reactive with phosphorylated tyrosine located at amino acid 1235 in the human MET sequence. Binding to this pYl235 residue is independent of the phosphorylation of other tyrosines in the vicinity (1230 and 1234), does not cross-react with these nearby phosphotyrosine residues, and does not occur when Y1235 is unphosphorylated. Researchers at the NCI seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations  to commercialize and develop a companion diagnostic for selective MET inhibitors.

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