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A Triple Combination HIV Microbicide

Three anti-HIV proteins- the antiviral lectin cyanovirin, the antiviral lectin griffithsin, and the monoclonal antibody 2G12- have been successfully expressed in the same rice seed. The co-expression allows for a low cost, stable production method for a triple anti-HIV microbicide for the prevention of HIV. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks licensees for the invention microbicide and production method.

Anti-CD133 Monoclonal Antibodies as Cancer Therapeutics

Researchers at NCI developed a rabbit monoclonal antibody that recognizes the marker for CD133 and is useful in pharmacodynamic testing to inform targeted anti-cancer chemotherapy development and clinical monitoring. CD133 is a cell surface glycoprotein used as a marker and expressed in stem cells such as hematopoietic stem cells, endothelial progenitor cells and neural stem cells. The NCI seeks collaborative co-development or licensing partners for this technology.

Anti-Py1235-Met Immunological Binding Reagent as Cancer Diagnostic

This technology consists of highly specific rabbit monoclonal antibodies reactive with phosphorylated tyrosine located at amino acid 1235 in the human MET sequence. Binding to this pYl235 residue is independent of the phosphorylation of other tyrosines in the vicinity (1230 and 1234), does not cross-react with these nearby phosphotyrosine residues, and does not occur when Y1235 is unphosphorylated. Researchers at the NCI seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations  to commercialize and develop a companion diagnostic for selective MET inhibitors.

Anti-Viral Compounds that Inhibit HIV Activity

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Molecular Targets Laboratory is seeking parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop antiviral tropolone derivatives developed by systematic medicinal chemistry on the lead series.

Bicistronic Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) Constructs Targeting CD19 and CD20

Chimeric Antigen Receptors (CARs) are engineered proteins that can be used in a therapeutic capacity when expressed by an immune cell (e.g., a T cell). Specifically, CARs comprise a targeting domain (such as an antibody or binding fragment thereof) as well as domains that activate immune cells. By selecting a targeting domain that binds to a protein that is selectively expressed on a cancer cell, it is possible to target immune cells to the cancer cells. Upon binding to the target cell, the immune cells are activated, leading to the destruction of the cancer cell. This therapeutic approach holds great promise, as evidenced by the recent FDA-approval of CAR-T cell therapies, KYMRIAH and YESCARTA, both of which target CD19.

Brain endothelial reporter cells

The National Cancer Institute seeks parties interested in co-development of safe and effective TEM5 agonists and/or antagonists that modulate WNT signaling.

Cancer Therapeutic based on Stimulation of Natural Killer T-cell Anti-tumor Activity

Investigators at the National Cancer Institute''s Vaccine Branch have found that beta-mannosylceramide (Beta-ManCer) promotes immunity in an IFN-gamma independent mechanism and seek statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize beta-ManCer.

Chimeric Antigen Receptors to CD276 for Treating Cancer

This licensing opportunity from the National Cancer Institute concerns the development of CARs comprising an antigen-binding fragment derived from the MGA271 antibody. The resulting CARs can be used in adoptive cell therapy treatment for neuroblastoma and other tumors that express CD276.

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