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Functionally-Interdependent Shape-Switching Nucleic Acid Nanoparticles

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed nucleic-acid-based nanoparticle that can be adapted for RNA interference (RNAi), molecular imaging, or a combination thereof. The invention nanoparticles can be used as therapeutics in the treatment of cancer, whichthe NCI seeks parties to license or co-develop.

Novel HPPK (Bacterial Protein) Inhibitors for Use as Antibacterial Agents

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed several novel small-molecule inhibitors directed against HPPK, a bacterial protein, as potential antimicrobial agents. The NCI seeks co-development partners or licensees to further develop these novel small-molecule HPPK inhibitors as broad-spectrum bactericidal agents.

Detection of Novel Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals in Water Supplies

Testing for biological activity of glucocorticoids and many other steroid endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) has not been previously performed. An automated, highly reproducible, and low cost assay detects biologically active steroidal EDCs and is suitable for wide application in testing water samples. The National Cancer Institute seeks partners for collaborative co-development research and/or licensing to move this technology into the public domain.

Increased Therapeutic Effectiveness of PE-Based Immunotoxins

To improve the therapeutic effectiveness of PE-based immunotoxins through multiple rounds of drug administration, NIH inventors have sought to identify and remove the human B cell epitopes within PE. Previous work demonstrated that the removal of the murine B cell and T cell epitopes from PE reduced the immunogenicity of PE and resulted in immunotoxins with improved therapeutic activity. The National Cancer Institute's Laboratory of Molecular Biology seeks interested parties to co-develop and commercialize immunotoxins using toxin domains lacking human B cell epitopes.

Novel Fusion Proteins for HIV Vaccine

The National Cancer Institute’s Cancer and Inflammation Program seeks parties to license gp120 and CD4-induced antibody fusion proteins for use in an HIV vaccine.

Chimeric Antigen Receptors to CD276 for Treating Cancer

This licensing opportunity from the National Cancer Institute concerns the development of CARs comprising an antigen-binding fragment derived from the MGA271 antibody. The resulting CARs can be used in adoptive cell therapy treatment for neuroblastoma and other tumors that express CD276.

Metformin for the Treatment of Age-related Retinal Degeneration

Researchers at the National Eye Institute (NEI) have generated Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPS) from two Late-Onset Reginal (L-ORD) patients with a dominant mutation in CTRP5 protein and two of their unaffected siblings. All iPS cells were differentiated into authenticated Retinal Pigment Epithelium (RPE) cells. The NEI seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for Metformin as an FDA-approved drug to treat Age-related Retinal Degeneration.

New Heterocyclic Scaffold-Based Inhibitors of the Polo-Box Domain of Polo-like Kinase 1 for the Treatment of Cancer

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) have developed novel heterocyclic scaffold-based inhibitors of the polo-box domain (PBD) of Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1). These compounds effectively arrest mitotic progression and cell proliferation in cell-based assays. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations to further develop these inhibitors for the treatment of cancer.

Substrate Reduction Therapy for Smith-Lemli-Opitz Syndrome and Related Disorders

The Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) is seeking parties interested in co-development or licensing a substrate reduction therapy for Smith-Lemli-Opitz Syndrome (SLOS) and other diseases which have a secondary Niemann-Pick type C disease like cellular phenotype.

Bicistronic Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) Constructs Targeting CD19 and CD20

Chimeric Antigen Receptors (CARs) are engineered proteins that can be used in a therapeutic capacity when expressed by an immune cell (e.g., a T cell). Specifically, CARs comprise a targeting domain (such as an antibody or binding fragment thereof) as well as domains that activate immune cells. By selecting a targeting domain that binds to a protein that is selectively expressed on a cancer cell, it is possible to target immune cells to the cancer cells. Upon binding to the target cell, the immune cells are activated, leading to the destruction of the cancer cell. This therapeutic approach holds great promise, as evidenced by the recent FDA-approval of CAR-T cell therapies, KYMRIAH and YESCARTA, both of which target CD19.

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