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MUC-1 Tumor Antigen Agonist Epitopes for Enhancing T-cell Responses to Human Tumors

Scientists at NIH have identified 7 new agonist epitopes of the MUC-1 tumor associated antigen. Compared to their native epitope counterparts, peptides reflecting these agonist epitopes have been shown to enhance the generation of human tumor cells, which in turn have a greater ability to kill human tumor cells endogenously expressing the native MUC-1 epitope.

Human Antibodies Against Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus

The National Cancer Institute is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop antibody-based therapeutic against MERS-CoV, including animal studies, cGMP manufacturing, and clinical trials.

Autophagy Modulators For Use in Treating Cancer

Investigators from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) have identified five autophagy-inhibiting compounds (WX8 family) through a high-throughput screening. The NICHD seeks licensees and/or co-development partners for methods to treat cancer by administering these autophagy-inhibiting compounds.

Nitroxyl (HNO) Releasing Therapeutics

The National Cancer Institute's Cancer and Inflammation Program is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in licensing therapeutic agents that generate Nitroxyl (HNO) in physiological media.

Hydrocarbon Stapled Peptides that Inhibit the Linear Ubiquitin Chain Assembly Complex (LUBAC) for the Therapy of the Activated B Cell-like (ABC) Subtype of Diffuse Large B Bell Lymphoma (A Type of Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma)

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed an invention consisting of hydrocarbon stapled peptides that disrupt the linear ubiquitin-chain assembly complex (LUBAC), which is involved in NF-κB signaling. These peptides can be used as a therapeutic in the treatment of the activated B cell-like (ABC) subtype of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL), a type of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, as well as inflammatory diseases. The NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for inhibitors of NF-κB signaling and/or treatment of ABC DLBCL, as well as inflammatory diseases.

Anti-CD133 Monoclonal Antibodies as Cancer Therapeutics

Researchers at NCI developed a rabbit monoclonal antibody that recognizes the marker for CD133 and is useful in pharmacodynamic testing to inform targeted anti-cancer chemotherapy development and clinical monitoring. CD133 is a cell surface glycoprotein used as a marker and expressed in stem cells such as hematopoietic stem cells, endothelial progenitor cells and neural stem cells. The NCI seeks collaborative co-development or licensing partners for this technology.

Cancer Therapeutic based on Stimulation of Natural Killer T-cell Anti-tumor Activity

Investigators at the National Cancer Institute''s Vaccine Branch have found that beta-mannosylceramide (Beta-ManCer) promotes immunity in an IFN-gamma independent mechanism and seek statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize beta-ManCer.

Hydrocarbon Stapled Peptides that Inhibit the Linear Ubiquitin Chain Assembly Complex (LUBAC) for the Therapy of the Activated B Cell-like (ABC) Subtype of Diffuse Large B Bell Lymphoma (A Type of Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma)

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed an invention consisting of hydrocarbon stapled peptides that disrupt the linear ubiquitin-chain assembly complex (LUBAC), which is involved in NF-κB signaling. These peptides can be used as a therapeutic in the treatment of the activated B cell-like (ABC) subtype of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL), a type of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, as well as inflammatory diseases. The NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for inhibitors of NF-κB signaling and/or treatment of ABC DLBCL, as well as inflammatory diseases.

Small Molecule Anti-cancer Agents that Stabilize the MYC-G-Quadruplex

The proto-oncogene c-Myc is deregulated and overexpressed in ~70% of all cancers. Thus, c-Myc is an attractive therapeutic target. Beyond cancer, Myc is also a positive effector of tissue inflammation, and its function has been implicated in the pathophysiology of heart failure. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed novel small molecules that target c-Myc at the transcriptional level, thus enabling a potential pan-cancer therapeutic. Specifically, these compounds stabilize the transcription repressing quadruplex in the c-Myc gene promoter region. The National Cancer Institute seeks parties interested in licensing or collaborative research to co-develop these therapeutic targets.'

Sensitizing Cancer Cells to DNA Targeted Therapies

Chk2 is a protein kinase activated in response to DNA double strand breaks. In normal tissues, Chk2 phosphorylates and thereby activates substrates that induce programmed cell death, or apoptosis, via interactions with p53, E2F1, PML proteins. In cancer tissues, where apoptosis is suppressed, Chk2 phosphorylates and inactivates cell cycle checkpoints (via interactions with Cdc25, phosphatases and Brca1 proteins), which allows cancer cells to repair and tolerate DNA damage. Hence, Chk2 inhibitors would be expected to protect normal tissues by reducing apoptosis, and to sensitize cancer cells to DNA-targeted agents. The National Cancer Institute seeks licensees for small molecule inhibitors of Chk2 for the treatment of cancer.

Improved Personalized Cancer Immunotherapy

The National Cancer Institute’s Surgery Branch seeks partners interested in collaborative research to co-develop adoptive transfer of tumor infiltrating leukocytes (TIL) for cancers other than melanoma.

Novel Small Molecule Antagonists Targeting Metastasis-Associated Lung Adenocarcinoma Transcript 1 (MALAT1) Long Non-coding RNA (lncRNA) as Anticancer Agents

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed an invention describing compounds that bind and alter the nuclear copy number of a long non-coding RNA (lncRNA), metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1), with the proposed consequence of inducing slower tumor growth and a reduction in metastasis. The NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for novel small molecule antagonists targeting MALAT1 lncRNA as anticancer agents.

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