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A Gene-Based Prognostic for Hepatocellular Carcinoma Patient Response to Adjuvant Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization

The gold standard of care for hepatocellular carcinoma patients with intermediate- to locally advanced tumors is transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE), a procedure whereby the tumor is targeted both with local chemotherapy and restriction of local blood supply. NCI scientists have identified a 14-gene signature predictive of response to TACE, and NCI seeks licensees or co-development partners to develop the technology toward commercialization.

A549 Cells: Lung Carcinoma Cell Line for Adenovirus

Scientists at the National Cancer Institute have developed a cell line designated A549 that was derived from explanted cultures of human lung cancer tissue. The A549 cell line has been tested under the guidance of the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) so, under current Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP), these cells may be suitable for use in manufacturing constructs for use in clinical trials. The National Cancer Institute seeks parties to non-exclusively license this research material.

BHD Tumor Cell Line and Renal Cell Carcinoma Line

Scientists at the National Cancer Institute  have developed a novel renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cell line designated UOK257, which was derived from the surgical kidney tissue of a patient with hereditary Birt-Hogg-Dube''''(BHD) syndrome and companion cell line UOK257-2 in which FLCN expression has been restored by lentivirus infection. The NCI Urologic Oncology Branch seeks parties interested in licensing or collaborative research to co-develop, evaluate, or commercialize kidney cancer tumor cell lines.

Cancer Therapeutic Based on Hypoxia Inducible Factor 1 (HIF-1) Inhibitors

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed small molecule compounds that inhibit activity of hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF-1). The HIF-1 inhibitor compounds are designed around the scaffold of naturally occurring metabolite eudistidine. The invention compounds have demonstrated activity against cancer and malaria in vitro.

Coacervate Micoparticles Useful for the Sustained Release of Therapeutic Agents

Researchers at the National Institute on Aging (NIA) have discovered novel microparticles that are formed using a coacervation process; the biodegradable microbead or microparticle is useful for the sustained localized delivery of biologically active proteins or other molecules of pharmaceutical interest. The microparticles have a matrix structure comprised of the reaction product of at least one cationic polymer, at least one anionic polymer, and a binding component (e.g. gelatin, chondroitin sulfate, avidin).

Computer-Aided Diagnostic for Use in Multiparametric MRI for Prostate Cancer

Researchers at the National Institutes for Health Clinical Center (NIHCC) have developed computer-aided diagnostics (CAD) that may further improve the already superior capabilities of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for detection and imaging of prostate cancer. This system produces an accurate probability map of potential cancerous lesions in multiparametric MRI images that is superior to other systems and may have multiple product applications.

Convolutional Neural Networks for Organ Segmentation

Computer automated segmentation of high variability organs and disease features in medical images is uniquely difficult. The application of deep learning and specialized neural networks may allow for automation of such interpretation tasks that are currently only performed by trained physicians. Computer automation may improve image analysis capabilities and lead to better diagnostics, disease monitoring, and surgical planning for many diseases. To help solve this challenge, researchers at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (NIHCC) have developed a technology that trains a computer to read and segment certain highly variable image features.

Convolutional Neural Networks for Organ Segmentation

Computer automated segmentation of high variability organs and disease features in medical images is uniquely difficult. The application of deep learning and specialized neural networks may allow for automation of such interpretation tasks that are currently only performed by trained physicians. Computer automation may improve image analysis capabilities and lead to better diagnostics, disease monitoring, and surgical planning for many diseases. To help solve this challenge, researchers at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (NIHCC) have developed a technology that trains a computer to read and segment certain highly variable image features.

Engineered Biological Pacemakers

The National Institute on Aging's Cellular Biophysics Section is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize biological pacemakers.

Genetically Engineered Mouse-Derived Allograft for Preclinical Studies of Metastatic Melanoma

Researchers at NCI have developed a means of more closely simulating in mouse models both melanoma cancer itself and the resulting physiological an immunological response by creating a genetically engineered mice (GEM)-derived allograft (GDA).  This allograft both resembles human-like melanoma and has features that will stimulate a normal immunological response in the mouse.

Methods for Single Cell Analysis of the Epigenome, Transcriptome, and Genome

There are currently no methodologies that allow for epigenome, genome and transcriptome analysis all in a single cell. In addition, there are currently no methodologies that permit repeating the results of these analyses on the same single cells. Scientists at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Laboratory of Cellular Oncology have developed a method for generating a “reusable” single cell that allows for repeated experiments on the same cell. Utilizing this methodology epigenomic, genomic, and transcriptomic analysis can be performed on the same cell. NCI seeks parties to license or co-develop the technology through research collaborations.

Renal Selective Unsaturated Englerin Analogues

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a number of analogs of the natural product englerin A, an inhibitor of renal cancer cell growth. Englerin A is thought to exert its anticancer effects by activating protein kinase C (PKC) theta, and exert cytotoxic effects through activation of transient receptor potential cation (TRPC) channels. The invention englerin analogues provide promising treatment strategies for various cancers, diabetes, and HIV, and other diseases associated with the PKC theta and/or TRPC ion channel proteins. Researchers at the NCI seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for englerin A analogue compounds.

Scytovirin Domain 1 Related Polypeptides

Researchers at the NCI seek licensing for novel anti-HIV peptide therapeutics. The researchers developed novel proteins for HIV inhibition. Scytovirin is a potent anti-HIV protein with two domains having strong symmetry. NCI researchers produced a much smaller, functional, scytovirin domain polypeptide – SD1 – for use as a HIV therapeutic.

siRNA Delivery Using Hexameric Tetrahedral RNA Nanostructures for Gene Silencing

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), in collaboration with researchers at the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB), developed a tetrahedral-shaped RNA nanoparticle for the delivery of siRNA to activate RNAi. The tetrahedral RNA nanoparticles can contain twelve Dicer substrate RNA duplexes for gene silencing. The NCI seeks parties interested in co-development or licensing of these tetrahedral RNA nanoparticles.

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