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Showing 161-173 of 173 results found

Therapeutic Antitumor Combination Containing TLR4 Agonist HMGN1

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a combination of immunoadjuvants and immune checkpoint inhibitors to stimulate an immune response against cancer. The combination therapy has been tested in xenograft models and shown successful for both treatment of an existing tumor and resistance to re-challenge. Researchers at the NCI seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for this invention.

Therapeutic Immunotoxins with Increased Half-Life and Anti-Tumor Activity

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks research co-development partners and/or licensees for mesothelin targeting Recombinant Immunotoxins (RITs). These RITs have been engineered by site specific modification with polyethylene glycol (PEG) to have an increased serum half-life, while maintaining high cytotoxicity and have greatly improved anti-tumor activity.

Therapeutics for Neurodegenerative Disorders and Cancer Using Lenalidomide Analogs

Novel thalidomide analogs and their use as immunomodulatory agents are disclosed in this invention by scientists at the National Institute on Aging (NIA). These therapeutic compounds could reduce chronic systemic and central nervous system inflammation. The NIA seeks licensing or co-development partners to commercialize this technology.

Transformation of Weak or Non-Immunogenic Antigens to Produce an Immune Response and Therapeutic Polypeptides for the Treatment and Prevention of Cancer

Researchers at the National Institute on Aging (NIA) have developed a novel strategy for rendering weakly or non-immunogenic, shared (between self and tumor) antigens immunogenic, or able to produce an immune response. Further, they have created therapeutic polypeptides comprising tumor-associated embryonic antigens and chemoattractant ligands. Cancers targeted by these developments include breast, renal, lung, ovarian, and hematological cancers.

Treatment Regimens for hetIL-15

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed a treatment regimens for cancer and HIV using heterodimeric IL-15 (hetIL-15). The regimens allow access to B cell follicles, germinal centers, and tumor sites that are difficult for drug entry. A combination therapy for HIV infection is also described using hetIL-15 and a conserved element vaccine. Researchers seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for development and commercialization of treatment regimens for HIV infection.

Use of Acetalax for Treatment of Triple Negative Breast Cancer

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks research co-development and/or potential licensees for a potential novel treatment for triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) with acetalax (oxyphenisatin acetate). Acetalax is a previously FDA approved drug that has been used as a topical laxative but is being repurposed here as an onco-therapy because of its cytotoxic effects on a number of TNBC and other cancer cell lines.

Use of Cucurbitacins and Withanolides for the Treatment of Cancer

The National Cancer Institute's Laboratory of Experimental Immunology, Cancer Inflammation Program, seeks parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop, evaluate, or commercialize the use of certain cucurbatacins or withanolides in combination with pro-apoptotic agonists of TRAIL death receptors for cancer therapy.

Use of Heterodimeric IL-15 in Adoptive Cell Transfer

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a technology that provides methods of performing adoptive cell transfer (ACT), an immunotherapeutic approach for cancer treatment, by administering a heterodimeric Interleukin 15/Interleukin 15 receptor alpha (IL-15/IL-15Rα) complex (hetlL-15) in the absence of lymphodepletion, thereby eliminating any lymphodepletion-associated detrimental side effects.

Use of the TP5 Peptide for the Treatment of Cancer

Increased cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) activity has recently emerged as a contributor to cancer progression. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) have shown that TP5, a small peptide inhibitor of CDK5 modified to facilitate passage through the blood brain barrier (BBB), has potential therapeutic benefit in glioblastoma (GBM) and colorectal carcinoma (CRC). NCI is seeking parties interested in co-developing and/or licensing TP5 for its use in the treatment of cancers with aberrant CDK5 expression as a mono-therapy or in an adjuvant setting with current standard-of-care.

Virus-Like Particles That Can Deliver Proteins and RNA

The present invention describes novel virus-like particles (VLPs) that are capable of binding to and replicating within a target mammalian cell, including human cells. The claimed VLPs are safer than viral delivery because they are incapable of re-infecting target cells. The National Cancer Institute's Protein Expression Laboratory seeks parties interested in licensing the novel delivery of RNA to mammalian cells using virus-like particles.

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