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Bicistronic Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) Constructs Targeting CD19 and CD20

Chimeric Antigen Receptors (CARs) are engineered proteins that can be used in a therapeutic capacity when expressed by an immune cell (e.g., a T cell). Specifically, CARs comprise a targeting domain (such as an antibody or binding fragment thereof) as well as domains that activate immune cells. By selecting a targeting domain that binds to a protein that is selectively expressed on a cancer cell, it is possible to target immune cells to the cancer cells. Upon binding to the target cell, the immune cells are activated, leading to the destruction of the cancer cell. This therapeutic approach holds great promise, as evidenced by the recent FDA-approval of CAR-T cell therapies, KYMRIAH and YESCARTA, both of which target CD19.

Anti-Viral Compounds that Inhibit HIV Activity

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Molecular Targets Laboratory is seeking parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop antiviral tropolone derivatives developed by systematic medicinal chemistry on the lead series.

Anti-CD133 Monoclonal Antibodies as Cancer Therapeutics

Researchers at NCI developed a rabbit monoclonal antibody that recognizes the marker for CD133 and is useful in pharmacodynamic testing to inform targeted anti-cancer chemotherapy development and clinical monitoring. CD133 is a cell surface glycoprotein used as a marker and expressed in stem cells such as hematopoietic stem cells, endothelial progenitor cells and neural stem cells. The NCI seeks collaborative co-development or licensing partners for this technology.

A Triple Combination HIV Microbicide

Three anti-HIV proteins- the antiviral lectin cyanovirin, the antiviral lectin griffithsin, and the monoclonal antibody 2G12- have been successfully expressed in the same rice seed. The co-expression allows for a low cost, stable production method for a triple anti-HIV microbicide for the prevention of HIV. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks licensees for the invention microbicide and production method.

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