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High Affinity Nanobodies Targeting B7-H3 (CD276) for Treating Solid Tumors

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have isolated a panel of anti-CD276 (also called B7-H3) single domain antibodies (also known as nanobodies). These antibodies have a high affinity for CD276-positive tumor cells and have great potential for diagnostic and therapeutic technologies against solid tumors. The NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for CD276-targeting camel nanobodies.

Human Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting Glypican-2 in Neuroblastoma

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute’s Laboratory of Molecular Biology (NCI LMB) have developed and isolated several single domain monoclonal human antibodies against GPC2. NCI seeks parties interested in licensing or co-developing GPC2 antibodies and/or conjugates.

Human T Cell Receptors for Treating Cancer

T cell receptors (TCRs) are proteins that recognize antigens in the context of infected or transformed cells and activate T cells to mediate an immune response and destroy abnormal cells. The National Cancer Institute's Surgery Branch seeks interested parties to license or co-develop the use of T cell receptors (TCRs) cloned against the SSX-2 antigen for the treatment of cancer.

IgG4 Hinge Containing Chimeric Antigen Receptors Targeting Glypican-1 For Treating Solid Tumors

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute have developed a glypican-1 (GPC1) chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-T cells using short immunoglobin subclass 4 (IgG4) hinge sequences that are highly potent against GPC1-expressing tumors. NCI seeks research co-development partners and/or licensees to advance the development of GPC1-IgG4 hinge CARs for the treatment of pancreatic cancer and other GPC1-expressing tumors.

IgG4 Hinge Containing Nanobody-based CARs Targeting GPC3 for Treating Liver Cancer

Scientists at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed a potent chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) targeting glypican-3 (GPC3). GPC3 is a cell surface proteoglycan preferentially expressed on Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC). The specific HN3 nanobody-IgG4H-CD28TM CAR included in this invention was much more potent both in in vitro cell models and in vivo mouse models. The NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for further development of the anti-GPC3 CAR to treat liver cancer.

Improved HIV Vaccines Through Ras Activation

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Vaccine Branch, seeks research co-development or licenses for a novel method of improving HIV vaccine efficacy by activating Ras signaling. Upregulating the Ras pathway can improve an HIV patient’s immune response to anti-retroviral vaccines.

In silico design of RNA nanoparticles

The National Cancer Institute seeks parties interested in licensing or collaborative research to co-develop RNA nanostructures using computational and synthetic methods.

In vitro Generation of an Autologous Thymic Organoid from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

The thymus is the only organ capable of producing conventional, mature T cells; a crucial part of the adaptive immune system. However, its efficiency and function are progressively reduced as we age, leading to a compromised immune system in the elderly. Moreover, production of T cells with specific receptors is an important concern for cancer immunotherapy. Current in vitro methods produce immature T cells that are not useful for therapy. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have generated an autologous thymic organoid from human pluripotent stem cells to address this problem. The organoid can be used to develop clinical applications such as production of autologous T and natural killer T (NKT) cells and reconstitution of the adaptive immune system. NCI is seeking licensees for the thymic organoid and the method of its generation to be used in a variety of clinical applications.

Inhibition of T Cell Differentiation and Senescence by Overexpression of Transcription Factor c-Myb

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a method by which memory T cells can be generated from other T cell populations using overexpression of the transcription factor c-Myb. Importantly, these reprogrammed memory T cells show increased proliferative and survival capacity. This strategy could also potentially generate anti-tumor T cells with improved viability and therapeutic efficacy for adoptive ACT. Researchers at the NCI seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for this invention.

Interleukin 24 (IL-24) to treat inflammatory diseases

Researchers at the National Eye Institute (NEI) have developed a novel therapeutic strategy of using recombinant IL-24 protein to treat inflammatory diseases that involve the proinflammatory T-helper 17 cell (Th17) response, such as uveitis, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and Crohn’s disease. Researchers at the NEI seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for co-developing this technology as strategic partners or licensing it for commercialization.

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