You are here

Share:

Search Technologies

Showing 81-100 of 364 results found

Methods of Producing T-cell Populations Using P38 MAPK Inhibitors

Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) uses cancer reactive T-cells to effectively treat cancer patients. Producing many persistent T-cells is critical for successful treatments. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a method of producing larger populations of minimally-differentiated T-cells. NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations to further develop, evaluate, and/or commercialize this novel method of producing effective T-cell populations using p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitors.

Substrate Reduction Therapy for Smith-Lemli-Opitz Syndrome and Related Disorders

The Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) is seeking parties interested in co-development or licensing a substrate reduction therapy for Smith-Lemli-Opitz Syndrome (SLOS) and other diseases which have a secondary Niemann-Pick type C disease like cellular phenotype.

Reprogrammed Tumor Infiltrated Lymphocytes for Efficient Identification of Tumor-Antigen Specific T-Cell Receptors

Adoptive T Cell Therapy (ACT) has proven to effectively treat established tumors. This treatment consists of harvesting Tumor Infiltrated Lymphocytes (TIL) which specifically recognize cancer, expanding the tumor-specific TIL in vitro, and then reinfusing these cells into the patient for treatment. Both these lymphocytes and their T cell receptors (TCR) are valuable for cancer immunotherapy. Inventors from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed an improved method to identify tumor-specific TCRs by reprogramming TIL into stem cells. This invention is available to license further development.

T-Cell Therapy Against Patient-Specific Cancer Mutations

Scientists at the National Cancer Institute developed a method to identify T cells that specifically recognize immunogenic mutations expressed only by cancer cells. NCI seeks parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop or license T-cell therapy against cancer mutations

A Viral Exposure Signature to Define and Detect Early Onset Hepatocellular Carcinoma

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have identified a biomarker signature of viral infection that correlates with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) incidence in at-risk individuals. It has been validated in a longitudinal cohort to detect HCC with high sensitivity and specificity up to 7 years prior to clinical diagnosis. This viral exposure signature can be easily implemented into diagnostic assays for screening of HCC and is available for licensing and/or co-development opportunities.

Molecular Classification of Primary Mediastinal Large B Cell Lymphoma Using Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Tissue Specimens

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a gene-expression profiling-based molecular diagnostic assay to diagnose and classify primary mediastinal large B cell lymphoma (PMBCL) from diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL). The diagnosis can be done using routinely available formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) biopsies. The NCI seeks licensees and/or co-development partners to commercialize this technology.

High Affinity Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting Glypican-1

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have isolated two Glypican-1- (GPC1)- specific antibodies: the mouse monoclonal antibody HM2 that binds the C-lobe of GPC1 close to the cell surface, and the camel single domain antibody D4. The D4 single domain antibody (also called ‘nanobody’) has a high affinity for GPC1-positive tumor cells from both human and mouse origins. The NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations to advance the development and commercialization of these antibodies.

A peptide hydrogel for use in vascular anastomosis

Surgery specialists from Johns Hopkins University, in collaboration with researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), developed peptide hydrogel compositions and methods to suture blood vessels during microsurgery. The hydrogels particularly benefit surgeons in whole tissue transplant procedures. The NCI seeks co-development research collaborations for further development of this technology.

Design and Biological Activity of Novel Stealth Polymeric Lipid Nanoparticles for Enhanced Delivery of Hydrophobic Photodynamic Therapy Drugs

Scientists at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed a novel stealth lipid-based nanoparticle formulation comprising phospholipid, DC8,9PC and a polyethylene glycol-ated (PEGylated) lipid – such as DSPE-PEG2000 – that efficiently package a high amounts of hydrophobic photodynamic drug (PDT) – such as HPPH – in stable vesicles. This HPPH-loaded liposome system demonstrates higher serum stability and ambient temperature stability upon storage. It exhibits increased tumor accumulation and improved animal survival in mice tumor models compared to the formulation in current clinical trials. The NCI seeks co-development partners and/or corporate licensees for the application of the technology as an anti-cancer therapeutic.

RP2 and RPGR Vectors For Treating X-linked Retinitis Pigmentosa

The National Eye Institute (NEI) seek research co-development or licensees for advancing AAV8/9-based therapies for X-linked forms of retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP) caused by mutations in RPGR (retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator) or RP2 (retinitis pigmentosa 2) gene.

T Cell Receptors Targeting p53 Hotspot Mutations and Methods of Isolating the Same

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) identified a collection of T Cell Receptors (TCRs) that target specific mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor protein. These TCRs recognize “hotspot” mutations, which frequently occur in a variety of unrelated cancers. These TCRs can be used for a variety of therapeutic, diagnostic and research applications. Researchers at the NCI seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for these novel T cell receptors that recognize p53 mutations and methods for identifying p53 mutation-reactive T cell receptors.

Synthetic Bacterial Nanoparticles as Drug and Vaccine Delivery Vehicles

Engineered bacterial spores can provide many useful functions such as the treatment of infections, use as an adjuvant for the delivery of vaccines, and the enzymatic degradation of environmental pollutants. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute’s Laboratory of Molecular Biology have developed a novel, synthetic spore husk-encased lipid bilayer (SSHEL) particle that is uniquely suited for a variety of these functions. NCI seeks partners to license and/or co-develop this technology toward commercialization.

Methods of preventing tissue ischemia

The National Cancer Institute's Laboratory of Pathology seeks parties interested in licensing or collaborative research to co-develop therapeutics targeting vasodialation.

Pages