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Convolutional Neural Networks for Organ Segmentation

Computer automated segmentation of high variability organs and disease features in medical images is uniquely difficult. The application of deep learning and specialized neural networks may allow for automation of such interpretation tasks that are currently only performed by trained physicians. Computer automation may improve image analysis capabilities and lead to better diagnostics, disease monitoring, and surgical planning for many diseases. To help solve this challenge, researchers at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (NIHCC) have developed a technology that trains a computer to read and segment certain highly variable image features, and this technology is available for licensing.

Cell Line for Production of Recombinant Human Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-2

Recombinant human tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (rhTIMP-2) have been shown to suppress tumor growth and tumor-associated angiogenesis. NCI Radiation Oncology Branch (ROB) researchers have developed a unique HEK-293F cell line which stably expresses rhTIMP-2, increasing the production of TIMP-2 to quantities sufficient to be used for testing and development as a therapeutic for various cancers, ischemic diseases (myocardial infarct and cerebrovascular infarct), and neurodegenerative diseases.

Mobile Interconnected Evaluation and Learning Software

The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for use of software for substance use disorders, behavior modification, and cancer patient care and pain management, etc. NIDA has developed software that permits real-time communication of patient-reported data and associated geolocation data. The software can be used in patient treatment or as a research tool for evaluating effectiveness of treatments.

Cancer Vaccine Composed of Oligonucleotides Conjugated to Apoptotic Tumor Cells

Synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) containing unmethylated Cytosine-Guanine (CpG) motifs mimic the immunostimulatory activity of bacterial DNA. CpG ODN directly stimulate B cells and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC), promote the production of T Helper 1 cells (Th1) and pro-inflammatory cytokines, and  trigger the maturation/activation of professional antigen presenting cells. The National Cancer Institute, Laboratory of Experimental Immunology, seeks interested parties to license methods for inducing an immune response to tumors.

Gene-based Diagnostic Predicts Patient Response to Cancer Immunotherapy

Somatic mutations can alter the sensitivity of tumors to T-cell mediated immunotherapy. Identifying genes that positively regulate the sensitivity of cancer cells to T-cell mediated clearance is key for effective treatment in cancer patients. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have identified a panel of genes which are useful in predicting a patient’s response to immunotherapy. NCI seeks partners to co-develop or license the technology toward commercialization.

Methods of Producing Thymic Emigrants from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

Pluripotent stem cells are a promising source of T cells for a variety of clinical applications. However, current in vitro methods of T cell differentiation result in the generation of cells with aberrant phenotypes. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have now developed methodology for generating induced pluripotent stem cell thymic emigrants (iTE). Antigen-specific CD8αβ+ iTEs exhibited functional properties in vitro that were almost indistinguishable from natural naïve CD8αβ+ T cells, including vigorous expansion and robust anti-tumor activity. iTEs recapitulated many of the transcriptional programs of naïve T cells in vivo and revealed a striking capacity for engraftment, memory formation, and efficient tumor destruction. The NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for this invention.

Use of Cucurbitacins and Withanolides for the Treatment of Cancer

The National Cancer Institute's Laboratory of Experimental Immunology, Cancer Inflammation Program, seeks parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop, evaluate, or commercialize the use of certain cucurbatacins or withanolides in combination with pro-apoptotic agonists of TRAIL death receptors for cancer therapy.

Novel Regulatory B cells for Treatment of Cancer and Autoimmune Disease

Cancer cells have been found to directly activate resting B cells to form suppressive regulatory B cells (tBregs) and utilize them to evade immune surveillance and mediate metastasis. tBregs directly inhibit CD4+ and CD8+ T cell activity in a cell contact-dependent manner, induce FoxP3+ T cell activity, and promote Treg-dependent metastasis. The National Institute on Aging's Immunotherapeutics Unit, is seeking parties interested in licensing or co-development of regulatory B cells to control autoimmune diseases and strategies that inactivate tBregs to control cancer immune escape. 

Autophagy Modulators For Use in Treating Cancer

Investigators from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) have identified five autophagy-inhibiting compounds (WX8 family) through a high-throughput screening. The NICHD seeks licensees and/or co-development partners for methods to treat cancer by administering these autophagy-inhibiting compounds.

Monoclonal Antibody Fragments for Targeting Therapeutics to Growth Plate Cartilage

In collaboration with the National Cancer Institute (NCI), researchers at The Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute on Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) have discovered monoclonal antibodies that bind to matrilin-3, a protein specifically expressed in cartilage tissue, that could be used for treating or inhibiting growth plate disorders, such as a skeletal dysplasia or short stature. The monoclonal antibodies can also be used to target therapeutic agents, such as those for anti-arthritis, to cartilage tissue. NICHD seeks statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop, evaluate, and/or commercialize treatment of skeletal disorders using targeting antibodies.

T Cell Receptors Targeting KRAS Mutants for Cancer Immunotherapy/Adoptive Cell Therapy

Researchers at the National Institutes of Health have identified a collection of TCRs that exclusively recognize the common hotspot driver mutations in KRAS antigen, expressed by a variety of epithelial cancers, including pancreatic, colorectal and lung cancer. The mutated KRAS variants are recognized by the TCRs in the context of specific Class I/Class II HLA alleles. These TCRs can be used for a variety of experimental therapeutic, diagnostic and research applications.

Use of the TP5 Peptide for the Treatment of Cancer

Increased cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) activity has recently emerged as a contributor to cancer progression. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) have shown that TP5, a small peptide inhibitor of CDK5 modified to facilitate passage through the blood brain barrier (BBB), has potential therapeutic benefit in glioblastoma (GBM) and colorectal carcinoma (CRC). NCI is seeking parties interested in co-developing and/or licensing TP5 for its use in the treatment of cancers with aberrant CDK5 expression as a mono-therapy or in an adjuvant setting with current standard-of-care.

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