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T-cell Receptors Targeting CD20-Positive Lymphomas and Leukemias

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks licensees for a collection of T-cell receptors (TCRs) that specifically target the CD20 antigen expressed in B-lymphoid malignancies such as non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL), chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The TCRs are being developed as therapeutics for the treatment of lymphomas and leukemias.

Tethered Interleukin-15 (IL-15)/IL-21 to Enhance T Cells for Cellular Therapy

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a method to improve the function of therapeutic engineered T cells used for Adoptive T Cell Therapy (ACT) for various cancers and diseases through the co-expression of Interleukin-15 (IL-15) and IL-21 by a flexible linker to the cell membrane. Researchers at the NCI seek licensing for this invention.

Assays for Measuring and Quantifying DNA Damage

The National Cancer Institute seeks partners interested in licensing or co-development of assays for determining the levels of gamma-H2AX/H2AX to measure and quantify DNA damage.

Cancer Immunotherapy Using Virus-like Particles

A considerable effort has been devoted to identifying and targeting specific extracellular cancer markers using antibody based therapies. However, diminished access to new cancer cell surface markers has limited the development of corresponding antibodies. NCI Technology Transfer Center is seeking to license cancer immunotherapy using virus-like particles.

Reporter Plasmid to Identify Cancer Stem Cells

The National Cancer Institute’s Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Genetics seeks partners to co-develop lentiviral plasmids, a research tool for visualizing and purifying cancer stem cells.

Cell Lines Expressing Nuclear and/or Mitochondrial RNAse H1

The National Institute of Child Health & Human Development (NICHD), Program in Genomics of Differentiation, seeks interested parties to further co-develop small molecule inhibitors of RNase H1, especially in regards to genome instability, transcription, and translation.

Peptide Inhibitors for Viral Infections and as Anti-inflammatory Agents

IFN-gamma and IL-10 are cytokine signaling molecules that play fundamental roles in inflammation, cancer growth and autoimmune diseases.  Unfortunately, there are no specific inhibitors of IFN-gamma or IL-10 on the market to date. The National Cancer Institute seeks parties interested in licensing or collaborative research to co-develop selective IL-10 and IFN-gamma peptide inhibitors.

Multifunctional RNA Nanoparticles as Cancer and HIV Therapeutics

The promise of RNA interference based therapeutics is made evident by the recent surge of biotechnological drug companies that pursue such therapies and their progression into human clinical trials. The present technology discloses novel RNA  and RNA/DNA nanoparticles including multiple siRNAs, RNA aptamers, fluorescent dyes, and proteins. The National Cancer Institute sees parties interested licensing this technology  or in collaborative research to co-develop RNAi-based nanoparticle therapeutics for cancer and HIV.

Transgenic Mouse Model of Human Basal Triple Negative Breast Cancer

NIH scientists created and characterized an excellent mouse model for TNBC that shares important molecular characteristics of human TNBC making it highly useful for preclinical testing of drugs and novel therapies. This model may provide a valuable means of identifying new drugs and therapies that could be translated to human clinical trials.The NCI seeks parties interested in licensing this mouse model of prostate and triple-negative breast cancers to study cancer biology and for preclinical testing.

Nucleic Acid Nanoparticles for Triggering RNA Interference

RNA interference (RNAi) is a naturally occurring cellular post-transcriptional gene regulation process that utilizes small double-stranded RNAs to trigger and guide gene silencing. By introducing synthetic RNA duplexes called small-interfering RNAs (siRNAs), we can harness the RNAi machinery for therapeutic gene control and the treatment of various diseases. The National Cancer Institute seeks partners to license or co-develop RNA, RNA-DNA, and DNA-RNA hybrid nanoparticles consisting of a DNA or RNA core with attached RNA or DNA hybrid duplexes.

Synthetic lipopeptide inhibitors of RAS oncoproteins

It is well known that overactive Ras signaling is linked to many forms of cancer, and despite intensive efforts worldwide to develop effective inhibitors of Ras, to date there is no anti-Ras inhibitor in clinical use. Researchers at the NCI’s Cancer and Inflammation Program, in collaboration with scientists at Vanderbilt University and the University of Illinois in Chicago, have identified a number of small peptidomimetic compounds that bind to Ras proteins with nanomolar affinity. NCI’s Cancer and Inflammation Program seeks partners interested in licensing or co-development of synthetic, highly potent cell-permeable inhibitors of Ras that bind to the protein directly.

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