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A Novel Genetically Encoded Inhibitor of Hippo Signaling Pathway to Study YAP1/TAZ-TEAD Dependent Events in Cancer

The Hippo signaling pathway is one of the most frequently altered pathways in human cancer. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a genetically encoded peptide inhibitor of the Hippo signaling pathway members YAP1/TAZ-TEAD, to dissect and study the specific TEAD-downstream regulatory gene expression networks of cell proliferation, tissue homeostasis, and stem cell functions in different cell types and pathologies. The DNA construct encoding this inhibitor may be delivered to cells using lentivirus, adenovirus, or adeno-associated virus, and is a valuable research tool. NCI seeks licensees for this peptide inhibitor and the encoding DNA construct.

CytoSig: A Software Platform for Predicting Cytokine Signaling Activities, Target Discovery, and Clinical Decision Support System (CDSS) from Transcriptomic Profiles

Scientists at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed the Cytokine Signaling Analyzer (CytoSig), a software-based platform that provides both a database of target genes modulated by cytokines and a predictive model of cytokine signaling cascades from transcriptomic profiles. NCI seeks collaborators or licensees to advance the development of CytoSig for research, target discovery, or as a Clinical Decision Support System (CDSS).

Assay to Screen Anti-metastatic Drugs

The National Cancer Institute seeks licensees for a model used to study molecular mechanisms and/or signaling pathways involved in tumorigenesis, angiogenesis and metastasis of breast cancer and its response to therapy.

Metastatic ovarian cancer mouse models and cell lines for preclinical studies

NCI's Center for Advanced Preclinical Research (CAPR) has developed a Serous Epithelial Ovarian Cancer (SEOC) genetically engineered mouse model (GEM), GEM-derived SEOC orthotopic mouse model, and biological materials derived therefrom, with several key histopathologic, immunophenotypical, and genetic features of human SEOC. NCI CAPR seeks licensees for this technology.

A Rapid Method of Isolating Neoantigen-specific T Cell Receptor Sequences

Recent research has demonstrated that neoantigen-specific T-cell receptors (TCRs) can be isolated from a cancer patient’s lymphocytes. These TCRs may be used to engineer populations of tumor-reactive T cells for cancer immunotherapies. Obtaining sequences of these functional TCRs is a critical initial step in preparing this type of personalized cancer treatment; however, current methods are time-consuming and labor-intensive. Scientists at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a rapid and robust method of isolating the sequences of mutation-specific TCRs to alleviate these issues; they seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for the development of a method for isolating the sequences of tumor-reactive TCRs. For collaboration opportunities, please contact Steven A. Rosenberg, M.D., Ph.D. at sar@nih.gov.

Mouse Lines with Fluorescently Labelled Membrane Proteins Regulating Cellular Motility and Membrane Trafficking

Impairment of cell motility and membrane trafficking can result in enhanced cell proliferation and survival and increased migration and invasion leading to cancer. Several proteins involved in cell motility and membrane trafficking have been shown to be dysregulated in various cancers. Animal models that facilitate the study of roles of these proteins in vivo are therefore required. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks licensees for Mouse Lines with Fluorescently Labelled Membrane Proteins Regulating Cellular Motility and Membrane Trafficking

Methods of Producing Effective T-cell Populations Using Akt Inhibitors

Adoptive cell therapy uses cancer reactive T-cells to effectively treat cancer patients. Producing many persistent T-cells is critical for successful treatments. Researchers at the NCI seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for a novel method of producing effective T-cell populations using Akt inhibitors.

Novel Fixative for Improved Biomolecule Quality from Paraffin-Embedded Tissue

Researchers in the National Cancer Institute’s Laboratory of Pathology have developed an improved tissue fixative solution that is formaldehyde-free. This novel fixative, BE70, significantly improves DNA, RNA, and protein biomolecule integrity in histological samples compared to traditional fixatives. Additionally, BE70 is compatible with current protocols and does not alter tissue processing. NCI seeks partners to license this technology.

Mouse Xenograft Model for Mesothelioma

The National Cancer Institute is seeking parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop, evaluate, or commercialize a new mouse model for monoclonal antibodies and immunoconjugates that target malignant mesotheliomas. Applications of the technology include models for screening compounds as potential therapeutics for mesothelioma and for studying the pathology of mesothelioma.

Knockout and Conditional Knockout Mice-GPR116

Pulmonary surfactant plays a critical role in preventing alveolar collapse by decreasing surface tension at the alveolar air-liquid interface. Surfactant deficiency contributes to the pathogenesis of acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), common disorders that can afflict patients of all ages and carry a mortality rate greater than 25%. Excess surfactant leads to pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. NCI investigators created a G-protein coupled receptor GPR116 mutant mouse model and showed that GPR116 plays a previously unexpected, essential role in maintaining normal surfactant levels in the lung. The National Cancer Institute seeks partners interested in collaborative research to license surfactant modulating agents for the treatment of surfactant related lung disorders.

Transgenic Mouse Model of Human Basal Triple Negative Breast Cancer

NIH scientists created and characterized an excellent mouse model for TNBC that shares important molecular characteristics of human TNBC making it highly useful for preclinical testing of drugs and novel therapies. This model may provide a valuable means of identifying new drugs and therapies that could be translated to human clinical trials.The NCI seeks parties interested in licensing this mouse model of prostate and triple-negative breast cancers to study cancer biology and for preclinical testing.

Cell Lines Expressing Nuclear and/or Mitochondrial RNAse H1

The National Institute of Child Health & Human Development (NICHD), Program in Genomics of Differentiation, seeks interested parties to further co-develop small molecule inhibitors of RNase H1, especially in regards to genome instability, transcription, and translation.

Murine metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed orthotopic allograft models for pancreatic cancer that utilize cells or tumor fragments implanted into the cancer-free pancreata of recipient immunocompetent mice. NCI seeks licensees to commercialize this invention.

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