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T Cell Receptors Targeting KRAS Mutants for Cancer Immunotherapy/Adoptive Cell Therapy

Researchers at the National Institutes of Health identified a collection of TCRs that exclusively recognize the common hotspot driver mutations in KRAS antigen, expressed by a variety of epithelial cancers, including pancreatic, colorectal and lung cancer. The mutated KRAS variants are recognized by the TCRs in the context of specific Class I/Class II HLA alleles. These TCRs can be used for a variety of experimental therapeutic, diagnostic and research applications.

Chimeric Antigen Receptors to CD276 for Treating Cancer

This licensing opportunity from the National Cancer Institute concerns the development of CARs comprising an antigen-binding fragment derived from the MGA271 antibody. The resulting CARs can be used in adoptive cell therapy treatment for neuroblastoma and other tumors that express CD276.

Analogues of Withanolide E Sensitize Cancer Cells Toward Apoptosis

There is a need to develop compounds that can sensitize cancer cells to apoptosis inducing ligands, such as poly I:C and TRAIL. In collaboration with the University of Arizona, NCI investigators discovered a series of compounds in the withanolide family that synergistically enhance the response of cancer cells to treatment with an apoptosis-inducing ligand. The NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for development of withanolide E analogues for the treatment of cancer.

Peptide Mimetic Ligands of Polo-like Kinase 1 Polo Box Domain (“Plk1 PBD Portfolio”)

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed peptidomimetic inhibitors that disrupt Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1)-mediated protein interactions by targeting polo-box domain (PBD). These compounds are designed to selectively cause mitotic arrest in cancer cells with abnormal Plk1 expression. Researchers seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations to further develop the inhibitors.

Self-Assembling Nanoparticles Composed of Transmembrane Peptides and Their Application for Specific Intra-Tumor Delivery of Anti-Cancer Drugs

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for peptide-based virus-like nanoparticles that are fully synthetic and capable of delivering cytotoxic, radioactive, and imaging agents. The researchers are interested in commercial partners to conduct pre-clinical and pre-IND studies.

Virus-Like Particles That Can Deliver Proteins and RNA

The present invention describes novel virus-like particles (VLPs) that are capable of binding to and replicating within a target mammalian cell, including human cells. The claimed VLPs are safer than viral delivery because they are incapable of re-infecting target cells. The National Cancer Institute's Protein Expression Laboratory seeks parties interested in licensing the novel delivery of RNA to mammalian cells using virus-like particles.

A Rapid Method of Isolating Neoantigen-specific T Cell Receptor Sequences

Recent research has demonstrated that neoantigen-specific T-cell receptors (TCRs) can be isolated from a cancer patient’s lymphocytes. These TCRs may be used to engineer populations of tumor-reactive T cells for cancer immunotherapies. Obtaining sequences of these functional TCRs is a critical initial step in preparing this type of personalized cancer treatment; however, current methods are time-consuming and labor-intensive. Scientists at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a rapid and robust method of isolating the sequences of mutation-specific TCRs to alleviate these issues; they seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for the development of a method for isolating the sequences of tumor-reactive TCRs. For collaboration opportunities, please contact Steven A. Rosenberg, M.D., Ph.D. at sar@nih.gov.

Renal Selective Unsaturated Englerin Analogues

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a number of analogs of the natural product englerin A, an inhibitor of renal cancer cell growth. Englerin A is thought to exert its anticancer effects by activating protein kinase C (PKC) theta, and exert cytotoxic effects through activation of transient receptor potential cation (TRPC) channels. The invention englerin analogues provide promising treatment strategies for various cancers, diabetes, and HIV, and other diseases associated with the PKC theta and/or TRPC ion channel proteins. Researchers at the NCI seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for englerin A analogue compounds.

Improved Personalized Cancer Immunotherapy

The National Cancer Institute’s Surgery Branch seeks partners interested in collaborative research to co-develop adoptive transfer of tumor infiltrating leukocytes (TIL) for cancers other than melanoma.

Combination Therapy for Prostate and Breast Cancer

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute developed a novel method of immunogenic modulation in androgen and endocrine deprivation therapy. A combination of hormone therapy with immunotherapies such as PROSTVAC™, a Brachyury vaccine, PROVENGE™, ipilumimab, nivolumab, XOFIGO™, PANVAC, a yeast-MUC-1 immunotherapeutic, or HERCEPTIN™ can benefit prostate and breast cancer patients, especially those who have acquired resistances. The researchers seek parties to co-develop this method.

Bile Acids and Other Agents that Modulate the Gut Microbiome for the Treatment of Liver Cancer

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have discovered that primary bile acids and antibiotics are a novel therapeutic for the treatment of liver cancer and liver metastases. NCI is seeking parties interested in licensing and/or co-developing primary bile acids and antibiotics that have been demonstrated in vivo to attract natural killer T (NKT) cells to the liver and inhibit tumor development.

Anti-CD133 Monoclonal Antibodies as Cancer Therapeutics

Researchers at NCI developed a rabbit monoclonal antibody that recognizes the marker for CD133 and is useful in pharmacodynamic testing to inform targeted anti-cancer chemotherapy development and clinical monitoring. CD133 is a cell surface glycoprotein used as a marker and expressed in stem cells such as hematopoietic stem cells, endothelial progenitor cells and neural stem cells. The NCI seeks collaborative co-development or licensing partners for this technology.

Cancer-reactive T cells from Peripheral Blood

T-cells capable of reacting to mutations in cancer patients have potential use as therapeutics. Identifying and isolating these cells from patients is a crucial step in developing these treatments. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a novel method of isolating mutation-reactive T-cells from a patient’s peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL). The NCI, Surgery Branch, is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize this method of isolating mutation-reactive T-cells from peripheral blood.

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