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Multi-epitope Vaccines against TARP (ME-TARP) for Treating Prostate and Breast Cancer

Researchers at the NCI have developed a treatment for prostate and breast cancer using multivalent peptides derived from TARP, the T cell receptor gamma alternate reading frame protein. These immunogenic peptides from TARP elicit an immune response, triggering T cells to kill only the cancer cells within a patient. NCI seeks licensees or co-development partners to commercialize this invention.

T Cell Receptors Targeting p53 Mutations for Cancer Immunotherapy and Adoptive Cell Therapy

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute identified a collection of TCRs that exclusively recognize the common hotspot driver mutations in p53 tumor suppressor, expressed by a variety of human cancers, including colorectal, breast and lung cancers. The mutated p53 variants are recognized by the TCRs in the context of specific Class I/Class II HLA alleles. These TCRs can be used for a variety of experimental therapeutic, diagnostic and research applications.'

AT-3 Mouse Breast Tumor Cell Line

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks licensees for the AT-3 mouse breast tumor cell line derived from an autochthonous tumor model.

A peptide hydrogel for use in vascular anastomosis

Surgery specialists from Johns Hopkins University, in collaboration with researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), developed peptide hydrogel compositions and methods to suture blood vessels during microsurgery. The hydrogels particularly benefit surgeons in whole tissue transplant procedures. The NCI seeks co-development research collaborations for further development of this technology.

A Murine Model of Inflammation Based on Chronic Expression of Interferon-Gamma

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) has a novel mouse model of autoimmunity based on chronic interferon-gamma expression (ARE-Del). This mouse can be used as an in vivo model to study female-biased autoimmune diseases, including: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, Primary Biliary Cholangitis, and Ovarian Failure Syndrome.

Small Molecule Inhibitors of Drug Resistant Forms of HIV-1 Integrase

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute discovered small-molecule compounds whose activity against HIV-1 integrase mutants confer greater resistance than currently approved INSTIs. Preliminary DMPK and ADME studies have been completed by the NCI researchers. The National Cancer Institute seeks partners to commercialize this class of compounds through licensing or co-development.

IgG4 Hinge Containing Chimeric Antigen Receptors Targeting Glypican-1 For Treating Solid Tumors

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute have developed a glypican-1 (GPC1) chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-T cells using short immunoglobin subclass 4 (IgG4) hinge sequences that are highly potent against GPC1-expressing tumors. NCI seeks research co-development partners and/or licensees to advance the development of GPC1-IgG4 hinge CARs for the treatment of pancreatic cancer and other GPC1-expressing tumors.

Personalized Tumor Vaccine and Use Thereof for Cancer Immunotherapy

National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) seek licensees for a technology involving the preparation and use of personalized tumor vaccines for cancer immunotherapy employing a therapeutic strategy called MBTA. MBTA consists of vaccinations with irradiated tumor cells pulsed with phagocytic agonists (Mannan-BAM, a polysaccharide derivative of mannan), TLR (Toll-like receptor) ligands, and agonistic Anti-CD40-monoclonal antibody.

Development and Characterization of the SLC46A3 Knockout Mouse Line

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks licensees for an SLC46A3 knockout mouse line. SLC46A3 is a solute carrier of the Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS) and is thought to have roles in multiple diseases including nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, liver cancer and obesity.

T cell tuning molecules that modify the immune response to cancer cells

Researchers at the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) seek partners to collaborate on in vitro studies to validate these potential immunomodulators and to conduct in vivo studies in a murine cancer model to determine the effects of ligands (e.g., antibodies) to the proteins on the immune response to cancer cells. Preference will be given to responses received by March 31, 2016.

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