You are here

Share:

Search Technologies

Showing 121-140 of 364 results found

High-throughput Assay to Identify New Cancer Drugs

The National Cancer Institute seeks parties interested in collaborative research to evaluate or commercialize a diagnostic tool that can identify new drugs that increase chromosome instability.

Dual-Function Protein ATIA for Diagnostics and Therapeutics of Glioblastoma

Investigators at the NCI discovered an Anti-TNF Induced Apoptosis (ATIA) protein, which protects cells against apoptosis.  ATIA is highly expressed in glioblastoma and astrocytomas and its inhibition results in increased cell sensitivity to TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand induced cell death.  The National Cancer Institute seeks parties interested in licensing or collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize glioblastoma diagnostics and therapeutics.

Systems and Devices for Training and Imaging an Awake Test Animal

Researchers at the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) have developed an apparatus that is used to image rodents while they are awake. The biological effects of agents on the rats can be imaged (via MRI for instance) in real time over a prolonged period of time.

Software for Automated Generation of Density Maps

Available for licensing is computer software for the automated generation of density maps of macromolecular structures from a series of 2D digital micrographs of frozen hydrated specimens collected using an electron microscope equipped with an ultra-cooled computerized stage.

Assay to Screen Anti-metastatic Drugs

The National Cancer Institute seeks licensees for a model used to study molecular mechanisms and/or signaling pathways involved in tumorigenesis, angiogenesis and metastasis of breast cancer and its response to therapy.

In silico design of RNA nanoparticles

The National Cancer Institute seeks parties interested in licensing or collaborative research to co-develop RNA nanostructures using computational and synthetic methods.

Multifunctional RNA Nanoparticles as Cancer and HIV Therapeutics

The promise of RNA interference based therapeutics is made evident by the recent surge of biotechnological drug companies that pursue such therapies and their progression into human clinical trials. The present technology discloses novel RNA  and RNA/DNA nanoparticles including multiple siRNAs, RNA aptamers, fluorescent dyes, and proteins. The National Cancer Institute sees parties interested licensing this technology  or in collaborative research to co-develop RNAi-based nanoparticle therapeutics for cancer and HIV.

Establishment of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSC) from the Thirteen-lined Ground Squirrel

Hibernation in mammals is a seasonal state of metabolic suppression and dormancy characterized by a decrease in body temperature to survive extreme environmental stresses. A new Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC) line has been established from the neural precursor cells of wild type thirteen-lined ground squirrel (Spermophilus tridecemlineatus), a small mammalian hibernator with unique metabolic adaptations for coping with cold and restricted food supply. This ground squirrel iPSC line can be differentiated into many different cell types for hibernation studies, disease modeling, and drug screening for neuronal injuries or other diseases.

Transperineal Ultrasound-Guided Prostate Biopsy

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Center (CC) seeks Cooperative Research and Development and/or license agreements for Transperineal Ultrasound-Guided Prostate Biopsy

Polypeptides for Stimulation of Immune Response (Adjuvants)

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute, Laboratory of Molecular Immunoregulation developed compositions and methods for using HMGN and its derivatives as immunoadjuvants with microbial or tumor antigens.The National Cancer Institute, Laboratory of Molecular Immunoregulation seeks parties interested in licensing or collaborative research to co-develop polypeptides or antagonists for immune response regulation.

Overexpression of Phf19 on T Cells Enhances Therapeutic Effects of T Cell-Based Therapies (such as Chimeric Antigen Receptor [CAR] Therapies)

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a method to epigenetically reprogram CD8+ T cell fate by expressing elevated levels of the polycomb-like protein, Phf19. This technology is useful for improving T cell-based immunotherapies (such as CAR therapies) to treat a range of infectious diseases and cancers. NCI seeks licensing or co-development partners for this invention.

Pages