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Peptide Mimetic Ligands of Polo-like Kinase 1 Polo Box Domain (“Plk1 PBD Portfolio”)

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed peptidomimetic inhibitors that disrupt Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1)-mediated protein interactions by targeting polo-box domain (PBD). These compounds are designed to selectively cause mitotic arrest in cancer cells with abnormal Plk1 expression. Researchers seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations to further develop the inhibitors.

Cancer-reactive T cells from Peripheral Blood

T-cells capable of reacting to mutations in cancer patients have potential use as therapeutics. Identifying and isolating these cells from patients is a crucial step in developing these treatments. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a novel method of isolating mutation-reactive T-cells from a patient’s peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL). The NCI, Surgery Branch, is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize this method of isolating mutation-reactive T-cells from peripheral blood.

Treatment Regimens for hetIL-15

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed a treatment regimens for cancer and HIV using heterodimeric IL-15 (hetIL-15). The regimens allow access to B cell follicles, germinal centers, and tumor sites that are difficult for drug entry. A combination therapy for HIV infection is also described using hetIL-15 and a conserved element vaccine. Researchers seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for development and commercialization of treatment regimens for HIV infection.

Methods of Producing Effective T-cell Populations Using Akt Inhibitors

Adoptive cell therapy uses cancer reactive T-cells to effectively treat cancer patients. Producing many persistent T-cells is critical for successful treatments. Researchers at the NCI seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for a novel method of producing effective T-cell populations using Akt inhibitors.

Clinical Imaging with Acoustic Wave or Photoacoustic Tomosynthesis

Ultrasound-based cancer screening and biopsy imaging technique are a critical clinical need. Ultrasound based biopsy imaging can provide a real-time modality for lower cost that is comparable to, or complimentary to MRI imaging. Researchers at the NIH Clinical Center seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for Tissue Characterization with Acoustic Wave Tomosynthesis.

Anti-bacterial Treatments Using Peptide-Based Inhibitors of the STAT3-IL10 Pathway

Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious disease that typically affects the lungs. Current therapies include a panel of antibiotics given over a range of 6-9 months. As a result of the expense of treatment, the extended timeframe needed for effective treatment, and the scarcity of medicines in some developing countries, patient compliance with TB treatment is very low and results in multi-drug resistant TB (MDR-TB). There remains a need for a faster, more effective treatment for TB. NCI researchers seek licensing and/or co-development of peptide inhibitors of STAT3 and IL-10 developed to treat bacterial infections such as tuberculosis. See aslo: NIH inventions E-164-2007 and E-167-2010

Device to guide oxygen over cells for photo-oxidation

Device is used to guide a stream of oxygen or carbon dioxide over a dish of cells during fluorescence microscopy. Invention includes the 3D printing software to create the device. The device makes it possible to easily provide a steady source of oxygen or carbon dioxide to cells while operating a fluorescent microscope to oxidize fluorophores for later visualization in electron microscopy. NCI seeks commercial partners to license this technology.

Device for Growing Mammalian Cells on EM Grids

A device used to hold transmission electron microscopy grids that allows adherent mammalian cells to grow on and the 3D printing software to create the device, which the NCI seeks to license.

GTF2I Mutations as a Genetic Marker for Prognosis of Thymic Malignancies

Despite the growing number of biomarkers that are used for diagnosing and treating carcinomas in general, cancers of the thymus are still diagnosed, stratified and treated by a costly combination of histology, surgery and radiological procedures.  The lack of qualified biomarkers associated with thymomas and thymic carcinomas has also hampered the development of targeted therapies. The National Cancer Institute seeks partners interested in licensing or collaborative research to co-develop a prognostic PCR based test for thymic malignancies.

Ratio Based Biomarkers for the Prediction of Cancer Survival

The NCI seeks licensees or co-development partners for this technology, which describes compositions, methods and kits for identifying, characterizing biomolecules expressed in a sample that are associated with the presence, the development, or progression of cancer.

Novel Murine T-Cell Receptors for Treating Metastatic Thyroid Cancer

Metastatic thyroid cancer can be resistant to current treatment options such as radioactive iodine therapy. Targeting thyroglobulin, a thyroid-specific antigen, as part of an adoptive cell therapy approach will allow for new therapeutic possibilities. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for novel T-cell receptors for the treatment of metastatic thyroid cancer.

New T-Cell Immunotherapy that Targets Aggressive Epithelial Tumors

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute’s Experimental Transplantation and Immunology Branch (NCI ETIB) developed a T Cell receptor that specifically targets the Kita-Kyushu Lung Cancer Antigen 1 (KK-LC-1) 52-60 epitope that is highly expressed by several common and aggressive epithelial tumor types.

MUC-1 Tumor Antigen Agonist Epitopes for Enhancing T-cell Responses to Human Tumors

Scientists at NIH have identified 7 new agonist epitopes of the MUC-1 tumor associated antigen. Compared to their native epitope counterparts, peptides reflecting these agonist epitopes have been shown to enhance the generation of human tumor cells, which in turn have a greater ability to kill human tumor cells endogenously expressing the native MUC-1 epitope.

Human Antibodies Against Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus

The National Cancer Institute is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop antibody-based therapeutic against MERS-CoV, including animal studies, cGMP manufacturing, and clinical trials.

BODIPY-FL Nilotinib (Tasigna) for Use in Cancer Research

The National Cancer Institute''s Laboratory of Cell Biology is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize bodipy conjugated tyrosine kinase inhibitors that are currently used in the clinic for the treatment of CML or gastric cancers.

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