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Anti-CD133 Monoclonal Antibodies as Cancer Therapeutics

Researchers at NCI developed a rabbit monoclonal antibody that recognizes the marker for CD133 and is useful in pharmacodynamic testing to inform targeted anti-cancer chemotherapy development and clinical monitoring. CD133 is a cell surface glycoprotein used as a marker and expressed in stem cells such as hematopoietic stem cells, endothelial progenitor cells and neural stem cells. The NCI seeks collaborative co-development or licensing partners for this technology.

A Rabbit Anti-pT1989 ATR Monoclonal Antibody for Use in Immunoassays

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a monoclonal antibody against ataxia telangiectasia-mutated and Rad3-related (ATR) kinase phosphorylated at threonine 1989. The antibody can be used for pharmacodynamic assays to quantify drug action on the ATR target.

Chimeric Antigen Receptors that Recognize Mesothelin for Cancer Immunotherapy

Researchers at the NCI have developed chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) with a high affinity for mesothelin to be used as an immunotherapy to treat pancreatic cancer, ovarian cancer, and mesothelioma. Cells that express CARs, most notably T cells, are highly reactive against their specific tumor antigen in an MHC-unrestricted manner to generate an immune response that promotes robust tumor cell elimination when infused into cancer patients.

Methods for Single Cell Analysis of the Epigenome, Transcriptome, and Genome

There are currently no methodologies that allow for epigenome, genome and transcriptome analysis all in a single cell. In addition, there are currently no methodologies that permit repeating the results of these analyses on the same single cells. Scientists at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Laboratory of Cellular Oncology have developed a method for generating a “reusable” single cell that allows for repeated experiments on the same cell. Utilizing this methodology epigenomic, genomic, and transcriptomic analysis can be performed on the same cell. NCI seeks parties to license or co-develop the technology through research collaborations.

Near-IR Light-Cleavable Antibody Conjugates and Conjugate Precursors

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed novel groups of cyanine (Cy) based antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) chemical linkers that undergo photolytic cleavage upon irradiation with near-IR light. By using the fluorescent properties of the Cy linker to monitor localization of the ADC, and subsequent near-IR irradiation of cancerous tissue, drug release could be confined to the tumor microenvironment.

Anti-Py1235-Met Immunological Binding Reagent as Cancer Diagnostic

This technology consists of highly specific rabbit monoclonal antibodies reactive with phosphorylated tyrosine located at amino acid 1235 in the human MET sequence. Binding to this pYl235 residue is independent of the phosphorylation of other tyrosines in the vicinity (1230 and 1234), does not cross-react with these nearby phosphotyrosine residues, and does not occur when Y1235 is unphosphorylated. Researchers at the NCI seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations  to commercialize and develop a companion diagnostic for selective MET inhibitors.

Clinical Outcome Predictors for Mantle Cell Lymphoma

The invention is a novel methodology for predicting a mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) cancer patient’s survival prognosis. This information is important in helping determine the best course of treatment for the patient.

Clinical Imaging with Acoustic Wave or Photoacoustic Tomosynthesis

Ultrasound-based cancer screening and biopsy imaging technique are a critical clinical need. Ultrasound based biopsy imaging can provide a real-time modality for lower cost that is comparable to, or complimentary to MRI imaging. Researchers at the NIH Clinical Center seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for Tissue Characterization with Acoustic Wave Tomosynthesis.

Ratio Based Biomarkers for the Prediction of Cancer Survival

The NCI seeks licensees or co-development partners for this technology, which describes compositions, methods and kits for identifying, characterizing biomolecules expressed in a sample that are associated with the presence, the development, or progression of cancer.

Methods of analyzing virus-derived therapeutics

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute’s Biopharmaceutical Development Program recently developed massively parallel sequencing methods for virus-derived therapeutics such as viral vaccines and oncolytic immunotherapies, for which the NCI seeks licensees or co-development collaborations.

Computer-Aided Diagnostic for Use in Multiparametric MRI for Prostate Cancer

Researchers at the National Institutes for Health Clinical Center (NIHCC) have developed computer-aided diagnostics (CAD) that may further improve the already superior capabilities of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for detection and imaging of prostate cancer. This system produces an accurate probability map of potential cancerous lesions in multiparametric MRI images that is superior to other systems and may have multiple product applications.

SLCO1B3 Genotyping to Predict a Survival Prognosis of Prostate Cancer

This invention identifies two polymorphic genetic markers in the SLCO1B3 (formerly SLC21A8) gene, called 334T>G and 699G>A, that can be measured in genomic DNA obtained from a blood sample to predict survival from diagnosis of prostate cancer in that individual patient.

MADCO-Accelerated Multidimensional Diffusion MRI

The marginal distribution constrained optimization (MADCO) methodology is disclosed wherein a 2D (or higher-dimensional) spectrum is estimated from initial 1D marginal distribution data. These 1D marginal distributions are used as constraints in the reconstruction of the 2D spectra. MADCO accelerates and improves the reconstruction of multidimensional NMR relaxation/diffusion spectra, making it suitable for MRI applications on a voxel-by-voxel basis by vastly reducing the amount of data acquired and data necessary for creating MRI images.

Molecular Classification of Primary Mediastinal Large B Cell Lymphoma Using Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Tissue Specimens

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a gene-expression profiling-based molecular diagnostic assay to diagnose and classify primary mediastinal large B cell lymphoma (PMBCL) from diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL). The diagnosis can be done using routinely available formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) biopsies. The NCI seeks licensees and/or co-development partners to commercialize this technology.

Gene-based Diagnostic Predicts Patient Response to Cancer Immunotherapy

Somatic mutations can alter the sensitivity of tumors to T-cell mediated immunotherapy. Identifying genes that positively regulate the sensitivity of cancer cells to T-cell mediated clearance is key for effective treatment in cancer patients. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have identified a panel of genes which are useful in predicting a patient’s response to immunotherapy. NCI seeks partners to co-develop or license the technology toward commercialization.

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