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Virus-Like Particles That Can Deliver Proteins and RNA

The present invention describes novel virus-like particles (VLPs) that are capable of binding to and replicating within a target mammalian cell, including human cells. The claimed VLPs are safer than viral delivery because they are incapable of re-infecting target cells. The National Cancer Institute's Protein Expression Laboratory seeks parties interested in licensing the novel delivery of RNA to mammalian cells using virus-like particles.

Antibody and Immunotoxin Treatments for Mesothelin-expressing Cancers

The National Cancer Institute Laboratory of Molecular Biology is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in licensing or collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize antibody-based treatments of mesothelin-expressing cancers.

Cancer Inhibitors Isolated from an African Plant

The National Cancer Institute's Molecular Targets Development Program is seeking parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize cancer inhibitors isolated from the African plant Phyllanthus englerii. The technology is also available for exclusive or non-exclusive licensing.

Peptide Inhibitors for Viral Infections and as Anti-inflammatory Agents

IFN-gamma and IL-10 are cytokine signaling molecules that play fundamental roles in inflammation, cancer growth and autoimmune diseases.  Unfortunately, there are no specific inhibitors of IFN-gamma or IL-10 on the market to date. The National Cancer Institute seeks parties interested in licensing or collaborative research to co-develop selective IL-10 and IFN-gamma peptide inhibitors.

Biomarker signature development: microRNAs for biodosimetry

Alterations in microRNAs (miRNAs), a type of small non-coding RNAs, have been reported in cells/tumors subjected to radiation exposure, implying that miRNAs play an important role in cellular stress response to radiation. NCI researchers evaluated small non-coding RNAs, long non-coding RNAs (lncRNA), and mRNA, as potential non-invasive biomarkers for radiation biodosimetry. The NCI Radiation Oncology Branch seeks parties interested in licensing or co-development of RNA biomarker signature(s) for radiation biodosimetry.

Modulating Chemotherapeutic Cytotoxicity

The NCI seeks partners interested in in-licensing or co-development collaboration on CD47-targeting therapeutics for cardioprotection and autophagy modulation.

Metastatic ovarian cancer mouse models and cell lines for preclinical studies

NCI's Center for Advanced Preclinical Research (CAPR) has developed a Serous Epithelial Ovarian Cancer (SEOC) genetically engineered mouse model (GEM), GEM-derived SEOC orthotopic mouse model, and biological materials derived therefrom, with several key histopathologic, immunophenotypical, and genetic features of human SEOC. NCI CAPR seeks licensees for this technology.

Diagnostic Assays for the Detection of Thyroid Cancer

The Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child and Human Development’s (NICHD) Pediatric Growth and Nutrition Branch seek partners to co-develop a diagnostic assay to detect thyroid cancer.

Urine-based Diagnostic Assay for the Early Detection of Cancer

Researchers at the NCI have developed a urine-based diagnostic platform capable of predicting the onset of cancer. This high-throughput screening method quantifies metabolites to assess cancer risk, determine disease prognosis and monitor response to therapy.

A Rapid Method of Isolating Neoantigen-specific T Cell Receptor Sequences

Recent research has demonstrated that neoantigen-specific T-cell receptors (TCRs) can be isolated from a cancer patient’s lymphocytes. These TCRs may be used to engineer populations of tumor-reactive T cells for cancer immunotherapies. Obtaining sequences of these functional TCRs is a critical initial step in preparing this type of personalized cancer treatment; however, current methods are time-consuming and labor-intensive. Scientists at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a rapid and robust method of isolating the sequences of mutation-specific TCRs to alleviate these issues; they seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for the development of a method for isolating the sequences of tumor-reactive TCRs. For collaboration opportunities, please contact Steven A. Rosenberg, M.D., Ph.D. at sar@nih.gov.

A Rabbit Anti-pT1989 ATR Monoclonal Antibody for Use in Immunoassays

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a monoclonal antibody against ataxia telangiectasia-mutated and Rad3-related (ATR) kinase phosphorylated at threonine 1989. The antibody can be used for pharmacodynamic assays to quantify drug action on the ATR target.

Chimeric Antigen Receptors that Recognize Mesothelin for Cancer Immunotherapy

Researchers at the NCI have developed chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) with a high affinity for mesothelin to be used as an immunotherapy to treat pancreatic cancer, ovarian cancer, and mesothelioma. Cells that express CARs, most notably T cells, are highly reactive against their specific tumor antigen in an MHC-unrestricted manner to generate an immune response that promotes robust tumor cell elimination when infused into cancer patients.

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