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RNASEH-Assisted Detection Assay for RNA

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks research co-development partners and/or licensees for the development and commercialization of a diagnostic assay that detects sequence-specific (viral) RNA.

Diagnostic Assay for Determining Patient Response to Apoptosis-related Cancer Therapy

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed a multiplex assay to determine the efficacy of apoptosis-related drugs targeting the Bcl2 family of proteins or aid in the selection of cancer patients likely to respond. The NCI seeks partners for co-development or licensees for commercialization of novel immunoassays for determining or predicting patient response to cancer therapy.

Detection of Novel Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals in Water Supplies

Testing for biological activity of glucocorticoids and many other steroid endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) has not been previously performed. An automated, highly reproducible, and low cost assay detects biologically active steroidal EDCs and is suitable for wide application in testing water samples. The National Cancer Institute seeks partners for collaborative co-development research and/or licensing to move this technology into the public domain.

A Viral Exposure Signature to Define and Detect Early Onset Hepatocellular Carcinoma

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) identified a biomarker signature of viral infection that correlates with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) incidence in at-risk individuals. It has been validated in a longitudinal cohort to detect HCC with high sensitivity and specificity up to 7 years prior to clinical diagnosis. This viral exposure signature can be easily implemented into diagnostic assays for screening of HCC and is available for licensing and/or co-development opportunities.

Gene-based Diagnostic Predicts Patient Response to Cancer Immunotherapy

Somatic mutations can alter the sensitivity of tumors to T-cell mediated immunotherapy. Identifying genes that positively regulate the sensitivity of cancer cells to T-cell mediated clearance is key for effective treatment in cancer patients. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have identified a panel of genes which are useful in predicting a patient’s response to immunotherapy. NCI seeks partners to co-develop or license the technology toward commercialization.

Molecular Classification of Primary Mediastinal Large B Cell Lymphoma Using Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Tissue Specimens

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a gene-expression profiling-based molecular diagnostic assay to diagnose and classify primary mediastinal large B cell lymphoma (PMBCL) from diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL). The diagnosis can be done using routinely available formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) biopsies. The NCI seeks licensees and/or co-development partners to commercialize this technology.

High-throughput Assay to Identify New Cancer Drugs

The National Cancer Institute seeks parties interested in collaborative research to evaluate or commercialize a diagnostic tool that can identify new drugs that increase chromosome instability.

Anti-CD133 Monoclonal Antibodies as Cancer Therapeutics

Researchers at NCI developed a rabbit monoclonal antibody that recognizes the marker for CD133 and is useful in pharmacodynamic testing to inform targeted anti-cancer chemotherapy development and clinical monitoring. CD133 is a cell surface glycoprotein used as a marker and expressed in stem cells such as hematopoietic stem cells, endothelial progenitor cells and neural stem cells. The NCI seeks collaborative co-development or licensing partners for this technology.

Clinical Outcome Predictors for Mantle Cell Lymphoma

The invention is a novel methodology for predicting a mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) cancer patient’s survival prognosis. This information is important in helping determine the best course of treatment for the patient.

Anti-Py1235-Met Immunological Binding Reagent as Cancer Diagnostic

This technology consists of highly specific rabbit monoclonal antibodies reactive with phosphorylated tyrosine located at amino acid 1235 in the human MET sequence. Binding to this pYl235 residue is independent of the phosphorylation of other tyrosines in the vicinity (1230 and 1234), does not cross-react with these nearby phosphotyrosine residues, and does not occur when Y1235 is unphosphorylated. Researchers at the NCI seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations  to commercialize and develop a companion diagnostic for selective MET inhibitors.

Human Antibodies Against Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus

The National Cancer Institute is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop antibody-based therapeutic against MERS-CoV, including animal studies, cGMP manufacturing, and clinical trials.

Quantitative In Vivo Methods for Measuring Brain Networks

Researchers at the NICHD seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) method to quantitatively measure in vivo the estimated conduction time of nerve impulses in the brain.

3D Image Rendering Software for Biological Tissues

The Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research seeks parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop software for the automatic 3-D visualization of biological image volumes.

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