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Novel Regulatory B cells for Treatment of Cancer and Autoimmune Disease

Cancer cells have been found to directly activate resting B cells to form suppressive regulatory B cells (tBregs) and utilize them to evade immune surveillance and mediate metastasis. tBregs directly inhibit CD4+ and CD8+ T cell activity in a cell contact-dependent manner, induce FoxP3+ T cell activity, and promote Treg-dependent metastasis. The National Institute on Aging's Immunotherapeutics Unit, is seeking parties interested in licensing or co-development of regulatory B cells to control autoimmune diseases and strategies that inactivate tBregs to control cancer immune escape. 

Use of Cucurbitacins and Withanolides for the Treatment of Cancer

The National Cancer Institute's Laboratory of Experimental Immunology, Cancer Inflammation Program, seeks parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop, evaluate, or commercialize the use of certain cucurbatacins or withanolides in combination with pro-apoptotic agonists of TRAIL death receptors for cancer therapy.

Methods of Producing Thymic Emigrants from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

Pluripotent stem cells are a promising source of T cells for a variety of clinical applications. However, current in vitro methods of T cell differentiation result in the generation of cells with aberrant phenotypes. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have now developed methodology for generating induced pluripotent stem cell thymic emigrants (iTE). Antigen-specific CD8αβ+ iTEs exhibited functional properties in vitro that were almost indistinguishable from natural naïve CD8αβ+ T cells, including vigorous expansion and robust anti-tumor activity. iTEs recapitulated many of the transcriptional programs of naïve T cells in vivo and revealed a striking capacity for engraftment, memory formation, and efficient tumor destruction. The NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for this invention.

Anti-Viral Compounds that Inhibit HIV Activity

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Molecular Targets Laboratory is seeking parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop antiviral tropolone derivatives developed by systematic medicinal chemistry on the lead series.

Compounds that Interfere with the Androgen Receptor Complex

NCI researchers have identified novel compounds that inhibit FKBP52-mediated activation of the androgen receptor protein (AR), a major target for anti-prostate cancer therapeutic development. As FKBP52 is implicated in the regulation of other hormone receptors, anti-FKBP52 may be applicable in the treatment of hormone-dependent diseases such as diabetes or even used as contraceptives. NCI seeks partners to license or co-develop this technology.

High Affinity Nanobodies Targeting B7-H3 (CD276) for Treating Solid Tumors

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have isolated a panel of anti-CD276 (also called B7-H3) single domain antibodies (also known as nanobodies). These antibodies have a high affinity for CD276-positive tumor cells and have great potential for diagnostic and therapeutic technologies against solid tumors. The NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for CD276-targeting camel nanobodies.

Therapeutic Immunotoxins with Increased Half-Life and Anti-Tumor Activity

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks research co-development partners and/or licensees for mesothelin targeting Recombinant Immunotoxins (RITs). These RITs have been engineered by site specific modification with polyethylene glycol (PEG) to have an increased serum half-life, while maintaining high cytotoxicity and have greatly improved anti-tumor activity.

T-cell Receptors Targeting CD20-Positive Lymphomas and Leukemias

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks licensees and/or research co-development partners for a collection of T-cell receptors (TCRs) that specifically target the CD20 antigen expressed in B-lymphoid malignancies such as non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL), chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The TCRs are being developed as therapeutics for the treatment of lymphomas and leukemias.

Combination of Near Infrared Photoimmunotherapy Targeting Cancer Cells and Host-Immune Activation

Investigators at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) seek co-development partners and/or licensees for a new therapeutic approach that selectively targets cancer cells and prevents tumor regrowth. The novel method combines antibody-IR700 molecules and Near-Infrared Photo Immunotherapy (NIR-PIT), which has shown great potential in targeting tumors via a host immunogenic response, with already known and available anti-cancer immunomodulators to further enhance the antitumor response. The investigators have shown in mouse models that, when used in combination, NIR-PIT-treatment and standard antitumor agents conferred a potent vaccine-like effect, not only curing mice of local and distant cancers but successfully immunizing them against tumor regrowth.

T Cell Receptors (TCRs) Specific for Mutant p53

National Cancer Institute (NCI) researchers have isolated T cell receptors (TCRs) reactive to the highly prevalent p53-R175H mutant in the context of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II allele, HLA-DRB1*13:01. These TCRs can be used for a variety of therapeutic, diagnostic, and research applications. NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for TCRs that recognize the p53-R175H mutation and the associated HLA allele, and methods for identifying p53 mutation-reactive T cell receptors.

Method of Neoantigen-Reactive T Cell Receptor (TCR) Isolation from Peripheral Blood of Cancer Patients

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks research co-development partners and/or licensees for a novel method for isolation and construction of neoantigen-reactive T-cell receptors (TCRs) from peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) of cancer patients. This method generates accurate scoring of single T cells from tumors, as well as facilitates identification and reconstruction of unknown TCRs for immunotherapy.

Extremely Rapid Method to Isolate Neoantigen Reactive T Cell Receptors (TCRs)

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a novel method for identifying neoantigen reactive T cells and T cell receptors (TCRs), isolated from fresh tumors of common epithelial cancers. This highly specific and sensitive method allows rapid determination of the neoantigen reactive TCR sequences and can be very useful to translate this information into TCR-engineered T-cell populations for immunotherapy without the need to grow tumor infiltrating T-cells and expensive, time-consuming screening. The NCI seeks research co-development partners and/or licensees for this invention.

Margaric Acid Decreases PIEZO2 Mediated Pain

Investigators at the National Center for Complimentary and Integrative Health (NCCIH) and the University of Tennessee Health and Science Center have shown that administration of margaric acid can ameliorate pain induced by a variety of noxious stimuli in mice. In vitro and ex vivo studies in human and murine neural cells indicate that the mechanism of action of margaric acid is mediated by PIEZO2 (Piezo-type mechanosensitive ion channel component 2) function. NCCIH seeks research co-development partners and/or licensees for methods of using the fatty acid, margaric acid to treat pain.

Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 4 (FGFR4) Monoclonal Antibodies and Methods of Their Use

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed several high-affinity monoclonal antibodies to treat Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 4 (FGFR4)-related diseases including rhabdomyosarcoma and cancers of the liver, lung, pancreas, ovary and prostate. These antibodies have been used to generate antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) and chimeric antigen receptors (CARs), which are capable of specifically targeting and killing diseased cells. NCI seeks co-development opportunities or licensees for this technology.

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