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Personalized Tumor Vaccine and Use Thereof for Cancer Immunotherapy

National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) seek licensees for a technology involving the preparation and use of personalized tumor vaccines for cancer immunotherapy employing a therapeutic strategy called MBTA. MBTA consists of vaccinations with irradiated tumor cells pulsed with phagocytic agonists (Mannan-BAM, a polysaccharide derivative of mannan), TLR (Toll-like receptor) ligands, and agonistic Anti-CD40-monoclonal antibody.

IgG4 Hinge Containing Chimeric Antigen Receptors Targeting Glypican-1 For Treating Solid Tumors

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute have developed a glypican-1 (GPC1) chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-T cells using short immunoglobin subclass 4 (IgG4) hinge sequences that are highly potent against GPC1-expressing tumors. NCI seeks research co-development partners and/or licensees to advance the development of GPC1-IgG4 hinge CARs for the treatment of pancreatic cancer and other GPC1-expressing tumors.

Genetically Modified Hematopoietic Stem And Progenitor Cells (HSPCs) And Mesenchymal Cells As A Platform To Reduce Or Prevent Metastasis, Treat Autoimmune And Inflammatory Disorders, And Rebalance The Immune Milieu And Dysregulated Niches

There is a marked increase in immunosuppressive myeloid progenitors and myeloid cells in tumors and at metastatic tissue sites, rendering these types of cells useful in cancer therapeutics – especially after genetic modifications to improve their anti-tumor properties. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks research co-development or licensing for genetically engineered myeloid cells (GEMys) for use in cancer immunotherapy.

CD206 Small Molecule Modulators, Their Use and Methods for Preparation

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have discovered a small molecule that binds to CD206 and activates M2-like tumor associated macrophages resulting in innate and adaptive anti-tumor responses. NCI seeks research co-development or licensees for CD206 small molecule modulators as a therapeutic for CD206-expressing cancers (such as pancreatic, sarcoma, head and neck, lung, gastric, triple negative breast, renal cell, colorectal cancer, melanoma).

Synergistic Use of Exo VII Inhibitors And Quinolone Antibiotics For Treating Bacterial Infection

Scientists at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have discovered a bacterial exonuclease VII (ExoVII) inhibitor that increases the potency of widely used quinolone antibiotics targeting prokaryotic type IIA topoisomerases. NCI seeks research co-development partners and/or licensees for the development of ExoVII inhibitors as new antibiotic adjuvants to boost the efficacy of quinolone antibiotics and/or restore the susceptibility of resistant bacteria.

T-cell Receptors Targeting CD20-Positive Lymphomas and Leukemias

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks licensees for a collection of T-cell receptors (TCRs) that specifically target the CD20 antigen expressed in B-lymphoid malignancies such as non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL), chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The TCRs are being developed as therapeutics for the treatment of lymphomas and leukemias.

Use of Cucurbitacins and Withanolides for the Treatment of Cancer

The National Cancer Institute's Laboratory of Experimental Immunology, Cancer Inflammation Program, seeks parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop, evaluate, or commercialize the use of certain cucurbatacins or withanolides in combination with pro-apoptotic agonists of TRAIL death receptors for cancer therapy.

Methods of Producing T-cell Populations Using P38 MAPK Inhibitors

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed a method of producing larger populations of minimally-differentiated, persistent T-cells, which is critical for successful treatments, using p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitors. NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations to further develop, evaluate, and/or commercialize this new method.

Use of the TP5 Peptide for the Treatment of Cancer

Increased cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) activity has recently emerged as a contributor to cancer progression. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) have shown that TP5, a small peptide inhibitor of CDK5 modified to facilitate passage through the blood brain barrier (BBB), has potential therapeutic benefit in glioblastoma (GBM) and colorectal carcinoma (CRC). NCI is seeking parties interested in co-developing and/or licensing TP5 for its use in the treatment of cancers with aberrant CDK5 expression as a mono-therapy or in an adjuvant setting with current standard-of-care.

Use of Acetalax for Treatment of Triple Negative Breast Cancer

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks research co-development and/or potential licensees for a potential novel treatment for triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) with acetalax (oxyphenisatin acetate). Acetalax is a previously FDA approved drug that has been used as a topical laxative but is being repurposed here as an onco-therapy because of its cytotoxic effects on a number of TNBC and other cancer cell lines.

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