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Novel Fixative for Improved Biomolecule Quality from Paraffin-Embedded Tissue

Researchers in the National Cancer Institute’s Laboratory of Pathology have developed an improved tissue fixative solution that is formaldehyde-free. This novel fixative, BE70, significantly improves DNA, RNA, and protein biomolecule integrity in histological samples compared to traditional fixatives. Additionally, BE70 is compatible with current protocols and does not alter tissue processing. NCI seeks partners to license this technology.

Targeted RNA/DNA Nanoparticles with Single Stranded RNA Toeholds

The technology is directed to the use of single-stranded RNA overhangs or toeholds of varying lengths (< 12 nucleotides) contained in nucleic acid-based nanoparticles which trigger the association of these nanoparticles and activates multiple functionalities such as gene silencing and/or cell-specific targeting. The use of RNA toeholds is superior to that of DNA toeholds in that it allows for smaller nanoparticles (fewer nucleotides for the toeholds) resulting in greater chemical stability, less immunogenic and higher yield of production. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for use of RNA overhangs or toeholds in nucleic acid nanoparticles.

Fusion Proteins as HIV-1 Entry Inhibitors

Novel fusion proteins with good stability and potency against HIV-1. These fusion proteins have good drug properties and potential as prophylactics or therapeutics against HIV-1 infection. Researchers at the NCI seek licensing for the development and commercialization of novel fusion proteins as therapeutics or prophylactics against HIV-1 infection.

Interleukin 24 (IL-24) to treat inflammatory diseases

Researchers at the National Eye Institute (NEI) have developed a novel therapeutic strategy of using recombinant IL-24 protein to treat inflammatory diseases that involve the proinflammatory T-helper 17 cell (Th17) response, such as uveitis, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and Crohn’s disease. Researchers at the NEI seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for co-developing this technology as strategic partners or licensing it for commercialization.

Improved HIV Vaccines Through Ras Activation

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Vaccine Branch, seeks research co-development or licenses for a novel method of improving HIV vaccine efficacy by activating Ras signaling. Upregulating the Ras pathway can improve an HIV patient’s immune response to anti-retroviral vaccines.

Enhanced Immunogenicity Against HIV-1 Using a DNA-prime Poxvirus Vaccination

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) seek research co-development or licenses for a method of stimulating an immune response in a human at risk for infection by, or already infected with, an HIV-1 retrovirus. This method utilizes DNA vaccines to stimulate CD8+ T cell immune responses.

New Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) Format for Developing Improved Adoptive Cell Therapies

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a new format for expressing Chimeric Antigen Receptors (CARs) that is available for licensing and co-development. The inventors found that there was an increased therapeutic effect when using their proprietary (anti-glypican 3 [GPC3]) hYP7 antibody in this format. The novel technology is useful for improving CAR therapies to treat a range of cancers.

Isotropic Generalized Diffusion Tensor MRI

The Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute for Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) seeks research and co-development partners or licensees for an invention that discloses the diagnosis of pathologies in tissue related to changes in cell size, cellularity, cell infiltration, and other abnormalities detected by bulk water diffusion changes.

Transformation of Weak or Non-Immunogenic Antigens to Produce an Immune Response and Therapeutic Polypeptides for the Treatment and Prevention of Cancer

Researchers at the National Institute on Aging (NIA) have developed a novel strategy for rendering weakly or non-immunogenic, shared (between self and tumor) antigens immunogenic, or able to produce an immune response. Further, they have created therapeutic polypeptides comprising tumor-associated embryonic antigens and chemoattractant ligands. Cancers targeted by these developments include breast, renal, lung, ovarian, and hematological cancers.

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