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Anti-bacterial Treatments Using Peptide-Based Inhibitors of the STAT3-IL10 Pathway

Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious disease that typically affects the lungs. Current therapies include a panel of antibiotics given over a range of 6-9 months. As a result of the expense of treatment, the extended timeframe needed for effective treatment, and the scarcity of medicines in some developing countries, patient compliance with TB treatment is very low and results in multi-drug resistant TB (MDR-TB). There remains a need for a faster, more effective treatment for TB. NCI researchers seek licensing and/or co-development of peptide inhibitors of STAT3 and IL-10 developed to treat bacterial infections such as tuberculosis. See aslo: NIH inventions E-164-2007 and E-167-2010

GTF2I Mutations as a Genetic Marker for Prognosis of Thymic Malignancies

Despite the growing number of biomarkers that are used for diagnosing and treating carcinomas in general, cancers of the thymus are still diagnosed, stratified and treated by a costly combination of histology, surgery and radiological procedures.  The lack of qualified biomarkers associated with thymomas and thymic carcinomas has also hampered the development of targeted therapies. The National Cancer Institute seeks partners interested in licensing or collaborative research to co-develop a prognostic PCR based test for thymic malignancies.

Novel Murine T-Cell Receptors for Treating Metastatic Thyroid Cancer

Metastatic thyroid cancer can be resistant to current treatment options such as radioactive iodine therapy. Targeting thyroglobulin, a thyroid-specific antigen, as part of an adoptive cell therapy approach will allow for new therapeutic possibilities. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for novel T-cell receptors for the treatment of metastatic thyroid cancer.

Assay to Screen Anti-metastatic Drugs

The National Cancer Institute seeks licensees for a model used to study molecular mechanisms and/or signaling pathways involved in tumorigenesis, angiogenesis and metastasis of breast cancer and its response to therapy.

In silico design of RNA nanoparticles

The National Cancer Institute seeks parties interested in licensing or collaborative research to co-develop RNA nanostructures using computational and synthetic methods.

Multifunctional RNA Nanoparticles as Cancer and HIV Therapeutics

The promise of RNA interference based therapeutics is made evident by the recent surge of biotechnological drug companies that pursue such therapies and their progression into human clinical trials. The present technology discloses novel RNA  and RNA/DNA nanoparticles including multiple siRNAs, RNA aptamers, fluorescent dyes, and proteins. The National Cancer Institute sees parties interested licensing this technology  or in collaborative research to co-develop RNAi-based nanoparticle therapeutics for cancer and HIV.

Establishment of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSC) from the Thirteen-lined Ground Squirrel

Hibernation in mammals is a seasonal state of metabolic suppression and dormancy characterized by a decrease in body temperature to survive extreme environmental stresses. A new Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC) line has been established from the neural precursor cells of wild type thirteen-lined ground squirrel (Spermophilus tridecemlineatus), a small mammalian hibernator with unique metabolic adaptations for coping with cold and restricted food supply. This ground squirrel iPSC line can be differentiated into many different cell types for hibernation studies, disease modeling, and drug screening for neuronal injuries or other diseases.

Polypeptides for Stimulation of Immune Response (Adjuvants)

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute, Laboratory of Molecular Immunoregulation developed compositions and methods for using HMGN and its derivatives as immunoadjuvants with microbial or tumor antigens.The National Cancer Institute, Laboratory of Molecular Immunoregulation seeks parties interested in licensing or collaborative research to co-develop polypeptides or antagonists for immune response regulation.

Overexpression of Phf19 on T Cells Enhances Therapeutic Effects of T Cell-Based Therapies (such as Chimeric Antigen Receptor [CAR] Therapies)

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a method to epigenetically reprogram CD8+ T cell fate by expressing elevated levels of the polycomb-like protein, Phf19. This technology is useful for improving T cell-based immunotherapies (such as CAR therapies) to treat a range of infectious diseases and cancers. NCI seeks licensing or co-development partners for this invention.

Niclosamide for Treating Adrenocortical Cancer (ACC)

Researchers at the NCI have developed a novel treatment for adrenocortical cancer (ACC) by repositioning the drug niclosamide. New treatments for ACC can help patients with this rare and aggressive disease, where the current standard of care involves highly toxic options. The NCI seeks parties to license this method of treating adrenocortical cancer using niclosamide.

Surgical Tool for Sub-retinal Tissue Implantation

Researchers at the National Eye Institute (NEI) developed a surgical tool to place tissue into position in the retina. The NEI seeks co-development or licensing to commercialize a prototype already in pre-manufacturing. Alternative uses will be considered.

Immunotherapeutics for Pediatric Solid Tumors

The National Cancer Institute’s Pediatric Oncology Branch seeks partners interested in licensing or collaborative research to co-develop new immunotherapeutic agents based on chimeric antigen receptor (CARs) for the treatment of pediatric solid tumors.

Gene Signature for Predicting Solid Tumors Patient Prognosis

The National Cancer Institute’s Laboratory of Human Carcinogenesis seeks parties to license or co-develop a method of predicting the prognosis of a patient diagnosed with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) or breast cancer by detecting expression of one or more cancer-associated genes, and a method of identifying an agent for use in treating HCC.

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