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In silico design of RNA nanoparticles

The National Cancer Institute seeks parties interested in licensing or collaborative research to co-develop RNA nanostructures using computational and synthetic methods.

Tumor Tissues Harboring Mutations in cAMP-specific Phosphodiesterases

The National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), Division of Intramural Research, is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize clinical samples with genetic mutations associated with endocrine tumors.

Improved Personalized Cancer Immunotherapy

The National Cancer Institute’s Surgery Branch seeks partners interested in collaborative research to co-develop adoptive transfer of tumor infiltrating leukocytes (TIL) for cancers other than melanoma.

Establishment of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSC) from the Thirteen-lined Ground Squirrel

Hibernation in mammals is a seasonal state of metabolic suppression and dormancy characterized by a decrease in body temperature to survive extreme environmental stresses. A new Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC) line has been established from the neural precursor cells of wild type thirteen-lined ground squirrel (Spermophilus tridecemlineatus), a small mammalian hibernator with unique metabolic adaptations for coping with cold and restricted food supply. This ground squirrel iPSC line can be differentiated into many different cell types for hibernation studies, disease modeling, and drug screening for neuronal injuries or other diseases.

Novel Small Molecule Antagonists Targeting Metastasis-Associated Lung Adenocarcinoma Transcript 1 (MALAT1) Long Non-coding RNA (lncRNA) as Anticancer Agents

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed an invention describing compounds that bind and alter the nuclear copy number of a long non-coding RNA (lncRNA), metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1), with the proposed consequence of inducing slower tumor growth and a reduction in metastasis. The NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for novel small molecule antagonists targeting MALAT1 lncRNA as anticancer agents.

Improved HIV Vaccines Through Ras Activation

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Vaccine Branch, seeks research co-development or licenses for a novel method of improving HIV vaccine efficacy by activating Ras signaling. Upregulating the Ras pathway can improve an HIV patient’s immune response to anti-retroviral vaccines.

Novel Small Molecules that Inhibit Hepatitis B Virus Replication by Targeting Packaging of Pre-genomic RNA

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed an invention describing novel small molecule agonists of a previously unidentified hepatitis B virus (HBV) RNA packaging signal (pgRNA) as promising therapeutic strategies for HBV infections, either alone or in combination with other antiviral agents. The NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for these novel small molecules that inhibit hepatitis B virus replication by targeting pre-genomic RNA.

Cancer Inhibitors Isolated from an African Plant

The National Cancer Institute's Molecular Targets Development Program is seeking parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize cancer inhibitors isolated from the African plant Phyllanthus englerii. The technology is also available for exclusive or non-exclusive licensing.

Griffithsin-Based Anti-viral Therapeutics with Improved Stability and Solubility

Scientists at the National Cancer Institute's Molecular Targets Laboratory have modified the Cnidarin-derived griffithsin compound to have greater storage time and stability. Griffithsin compounds are a class of highly potent proteins capable of blocking the HIV virus from penetrating T cells. The National Cancer Institute seeks parties interested in collaborative research to license or co-develop large-scale recombinant production of the compound.

Combination Cancer Therapy with HDAC Inhibitors

NCI researchers developed a combination therapy of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors and immunotherapies, such as checkpoint inhibitors, virus-based vaccines, monoclonal antibodies, cell-based treatments or radiopharmaceuticals. The NCI Laboratory of Tumor Immunology and Biology seeks parties to license or co-develop this method.

Biomarker signature development: microRNAs for biodosimetry

Alterations in microRNAs (miRNAs), a type of small non-coding RNAs, have been reported in cells/tumors subjected to radiation exposure, implying that miRNAs play an important role in cellular stress response to radiation. NCI researchers evaluated small non-coding RNAs, long non-coding RNAs (lncRNA), and mRNA, as potential non-invasive biomarkers for radiation biodosimetry. The NCI Radiation Oncology Branch seeks parties interested in licensing or co-development of RNA biomarker signature(s) for radiation biodosimetry.

A Rapid Method of Isolating Neoantigen-specific T Cell Receptor Sequences

Recent research has demonstrated that neoantigen-specific T-cell receptors (TCRs) can be isolated from a cancer patient’s lymphocytes. These TCRs may be used to engineer populations of tumor-reactive T cells for cancer immunotherapies. Obtaining sequences of these functional TCRs is a critical initial step in preparing this type of personalized cancer treatment; however, current methods are time-consuming and labor-intensive. Scientists at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a rapid and robust method of isolating the sequences of mutation-specific TCRs to alleviate these issues; they seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for the development of a method for isolating the sequences of tumor-reactive TCRs. For collaboration opportunities, please contact Steven A. Rosenberg, M.D., Ph.D. at sar@nih.gov.

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