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Multivalent Immunogenic Vaccines for Treating Prostate and Breast Cancer

Researchers at the NCI have developed a treatment for prostate and breast cancer using multivalent peptides derived from TARP, the T cell receptor gamma alternate reading frame protein. These immunogenic peptides from TARP elicit an immune response, triggering T cells to kill only the cancer cells within a patient. NCI seeks licensees or co-development partners to commercialize this invention.

Prognostic Biomarkers for Patients with Early Stage Lung Cancer

Investigators at the National Cancer Institute discovered a set of biomarkers that can identify patients with early stage lung cancer who are at a high risk of relapse. These prognostic methods can guide physicians to select appropriate treatment and follow-up while sparing other patients of unnecessary treatment and negative side-effects of chemotherapy. The NCI seeks parties to license or co-develop the invention.

A Mobile Health Platform

Researchers at the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) seek licensing or co-development of a mobile health technology that monitors and predicts a user’s psychological status in order to deliver an automated intervention when needed.

Use of Cucurbitacins and Withanolides for the Treatment of Cancer

The National Cancer Institute's Laboratory of Experimental Immunology, Cancer Inflammation Program, seeks parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop, evaluate, or commercialize the use of certain cucurbatacins or withanolides in combination with pro-apoptotic agonists of TRAIL death receptors for cancer therapy.

Cancer Immunotherapy Using Virus-like Particles

A considerable effort has been devoted to identifying and targeting specific extracellular cancer markers using antibody based therapies. However, diminished access to new cancer cell surface markers has limited the development of corresponding antibodies. NCI Technology Transfer Center is seeking to license cancer immunotherapy using virus-like particles.

RP2 and RPGR Vectors For Treating X-linked Retinitis Pigmentosa

The National Eye Institute (NEI) seek research co-development or licensees for advancing AAV8/9-based therapies for X-linked forms of retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP) caused by mutations in RPGR (retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator) or RP2 (retinitis pigmentosa 2) gene.

Analogues of Withanolide E Sensitize Cancer Cells Toward Apoptosis

There is a need to develop compounds that can sensitize cancer cells to apoptosis inducing ligands, such as poly I:C and TRAIL. In collaboration with the University of Arizona, NCI investigators discovered a series of compounds in the withanolide family that synergistically enhance the response of cancer cells to treatment with an apoptosis-inducing ligand. The NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for development of withanolide E analogues for the treatment of cancer.

Small Molecule Anti-cancer Agents that Stabilize the MYC-G-Quadruplex

The proto-oncogene c-Myc is deregulated and overexpressed in ~70% of all cancers. Thus, c-Myc is an attractive therapeutic target. Beyond cancer, Myc is also a positive effector of tissue inflammation, and its function has been implicated in the pathophysiology of heart failure. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed novel small molecules that target c-Myc at the transcriptional level, thus enabling a potential pan-cancer therapeutic. Specifically, these compounds stabilize the transcription repressing quadruplex in the c-Myc gene promoter region. The National Cancer Institute seeks parties interested in licensing or collaborative research to co-develop these therapeutic targets.'

Genetically Engineered Myeloid Cells (GEMys) as a Platform to Enhance Anti-Tumor Immunity

There is a marked increase in immunosuppressive myeloid progenitors and myeloid cells in tumors and at metastatic tissue sites, rendering these types of cells useful in cancer therapeutics, especially after genetic modifications that improve their anti-tumor properties further. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks research co-development or licensing partners to further develop genetically engineered myeloid cells (GEMys) for use in cancer immunotherapy.

Sensitizing Cancer Cells to DNA Targeted Therapies

Chk2 is a protein kinase activated in response to DNA double strand breaks. In normal tissues, Chk2 phosphorylates and thereby activates substrates that induce programmed cell death, or apoptosis, via interactions with p53, E2F1, PML proteins. In cancer tissues, where apoptosis is suppressed, Chk2 phosphorylates and inactivates cell cycle checkpoints (via interactions with Cdc25, phosphatases and Brca1 proteins), which allows cancer cells to repair and tolerate DNA damage. Hence, Chk2 inhibitors would be expected to protect normal tissues by reducing apoptosis, and to sensitize cancer cells to DNA-targeted agents. The National Cancer Institute seeks licensees for small molecule inhibitors of Chk2 for the treatment of cancer.

Brachyury-directed Vaccine for the Prevention or Treatment of Cancers

Researchers at the NCI have developed a vaccine technology that stimulates the immune system to selectively destroy metastasizing cells. Stimulation of T cells with the Brachyury peptide promote a robust immune response and lead to targeted lysis of invasive tumor cells. NCI seeks licensing or co-development of this invention.

Convolutional Neural Networks for Organ Segmentation

Computer automated segmentation of high variability organs and disease features in medical images is uniquely difficult. The application of deep learning and specialized neural networks may allow for automation of such interpretation tasks that are currently only performed by trained physicians. Computer automation may improve image analysis capabilities and lead to better diagnostics, disease monitoring, and surgical planning for many diseases. To help solve this challenge, researchers at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (NIHCC) have developed a technology that trains a computer to read and segment certain highly variable image features.

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