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The Biospecimen Pre-analytical Variables (BPV) Program

The Biorepositories and Biospecimen Research Branch (BBRB) at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) has sponsored various initiatives for conducting biospecimen research. Through these initiatives, NCI seeks to advance biospecimen science and improve research reproducibility by investigating how different biospecimen collection, handling and processing procedures affect biospecimen molecular profiles. BBRB is seeking collaborators to extend these studies.

MUC-1 Tumor Antigen Agonist Epitopes for Enhancing T-cell Responses to Human Tumors

Scientists at NIH have identified 7 new agonist epitopes of the MUC-1 tumor associated antigen. Compared to their native epitope counterparts, peptides reflecting these agonist epitopes have been shown to enhance the generation of human tumor cells, which in turn have a greater ability to kill human tumor cells endogenously expressing the native MUC-1 epitope.

A Rabbit Anti-pT1989 ATR Monoclonal Antibody for Use in Immunoassays

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a monoclonal antibody against ataxia telangiectasia-mutated and Rad3-related (ATR) kinase phosphorylated at threonine 1989. The antibody can be used for pharmacodynamic assays to quantify drug action on the ATR target.

Human Antibodies Against Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus

The National Cancer Institute is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop antibody-based therapeutic against MERS-CoV, including animal studies, cGMP manufacturing, and clinical trials.

Synergistic Combination Agent for Cancer Therapy

The Nanotechnology Characterization Laboratory of the Frederick National Laboratory for Biomedical Research seeks parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop a ceramide and vinca alkaloid combination therapy for treatment of cancer.

Immunotherapeutics for Pediatric Solid Tumors

The National Cancer Institute’s Pediatric Oncology Branch seeks partners interested in licensing or collaborative research to co-develop new immunotherapeutic agents based on chimeric antigen receptor (CARs) for the treatment of pediatric solid tumors.

Use of the TP5 Peptide for the Treatment of Cancer

Increased cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) activity has recently emerged as a contributor to cancer progression. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) have shown that TP5, a small peptide inhibitor of CDK5 modified to facilitate passage through the blood brain barrier (BBB), has potential therapeutic benefit in glioblastoma (GBM) and colorectal carcinoma (CRC). NCI is seeking parties interested in co-developing and/or licensing TP5 for its use in the treatment of cancers with aberrant CDK5 expression as a mono-therapy or in an adjuvant setting with current standard-of-care.

New Insect Sf9-ET Cell Line for Determining Baculovirus Titers

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks licensing partners for a novel modified insect cell line, Sf9-ET, that can quickly and efficiently determine baculovirus titers during the expression of recombinant proteins from a baculovirus-based protein expression system.

BODIPY-FL Nilotinib (Tasigna) for Use in Cancer Research

The National Cancer Institute''s Laboratory of Cell Biology is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize bodipy conjugated tyrosine kinase inhibitors that are currently used in the clinic for the treatment of CML or gastric cancers.

Method for Targeted Therapeutic Delivery of Proteins into Cells

The Protein Expression Laboratory at the National Cancer Institute in Frederick, MD is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop a platform technology for the targeted intra-cellular delivery of proteins using virus-like particles (VLPs).

Methods of Producing Effective T-cell Populations Using Akt Inhibitors

Adoptive cell therapy uses cancer reactive T-cells to effectively treat cancer patients. Producing many persistent T-cells is critical for successful treatments. Researchers at the NCI seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for a novel method of producing effective T-cell populations using Akt inhibitors.

Methods For Treating or Preventing Inflammation and Periodontitis

Natural products have long been considered a source of biologically active molecules against health disorders, including bone-loss related diseases. Cinnamolyoxy-mammeisin (CNM), can be isolated from Brazilian geopropolis and demonstrates anti-inflammatory activity. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), in collaboration with researchers at the Piracicaba Dental School, University of Campinas, Brazil, have shown CNM also demonstrates inhibition of oral bone loss. This invention is available for licensing and/or co-development opportunities.

New Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) Format for Developing Improved Adoptive Cell Therapies

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a new format for expressing Chimeric Antigen Receptors (CARs) that is available for licensing and co-development. The inventors found that there was an increased therapeutic effect when using their proprietary (anti-glypican 3 [GPC3]) hYP7 antibody in this format. The novel technology is useful for improving CAR therapies to treat a range of cancers.

CD19/CD22 Dual Target Chimeric Antigen Receptors to Treat Human B-cell Malignancies

Inventors at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) that target two B cell surface antigens, CD19 and CD22, improving treatment of B-cell malignancies, such as acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). NCI is actively seeking parties interested in licensing this invention to commercialist the bicistronic CAR construct targeting CD19 and CD22 for immunotherapy.

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