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Overexpression of Phf19 on T Cells Enhances Therapeutic Effects of T Cell-Based Therapies (such as Chimeric Antigen Receptor [CAR] Therapies)

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a method to epigenetically reprogram CD8+ T cell fate by expressing elevated levels of the polycomb-like protein, Phf19. This technology is useful for improving T cell-based immunotherapies (such as CAR therapies) to treat a range of infectious diseases and cancers. NCI seeks licensing or co-development partners for this invention.

Optical Microscope Software for Breast Cancer Diagnosis

Researchers from NCI and Rudgers University developed  methods of detecting abnormal cells in a sample using the spatial position of one or more genes within the nucleus of a cell, as well as a kit for detecting abnormal cells using such methods. The invention also provides methods of identifying gene markers for abnormal cells using the spatial position of one or more genes within the nucleus of a cell. The National Cancer Institute seeks parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop diagnostic methods for detection of cancer using spatial genome organization.

Nucleic Acid Nanoparticles for Triggering RNA Interference

RNA interference (RNAi) is a naturally occurring cellular post-transcriptional gene regulation process that utilizes small double-stranded RNAs to trigger and guide gene silencing. By introducing synthetic RNA duplexes called small-interfering RNAs (siRNAs), we can harness the RNAi machinery for therapeutic gene control and the treatment of various diseases. The National Cancer Institute seeks partners to license or co-develop RNA, RNA-DNA, and DNA-RNA hybrid nanoparticles consisting of a DNA or RNA core with attached RNA or DNA hybrid duplexes.

NSAIDs that Assist the Treatment of Human Diseases

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed compounds containing both a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) and a nitroxyl (HNO) -releasing agent that have significantly reduced toxicity, allowing their use for extended periods of time without severe side effects.The HNO-releasing moiety contained in this invention may expand the medical utility of NSAIDs. HNO releasing agents possess anticancer activity as well as good antioxidant properties, which has potential benefit for a variety of human diseases, including acute and chronic inflammation. NCI seeks parties to license or co-develop this technology.

Novel Small Molecules that Inhibit Hepatitis B Virus Replication by Targeting Packaging of Pre-genomic RNA

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed an invention describing novel small molecule agonists of a previously unidentified hepatitis B virus (HBV) RNA packaging signal (pgRNA) as promising therapeutic strategies for HBV infections, either alone or in combination with other antiviral agents. The NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for these novel small molecules that inhibit hepatitis B virus replication by targeting pre-genomic RNA.

Novel Small Molecule Antagonists Targeting Metastasis-Associated Lung Adenocarcinoma Transcript 1 (MALAT1) Long Non-coding RNA (lncRNA) as Anticancer Agents

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed an invention describing compounds that bind and alter the nuclear copy number of a long non-coding RNA (lncRNA), metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1), with the proposed consequence of inducing slower tumor growth and a reduction in metastasis. The NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for novel small molecule antagonists targeting MALAT1 lncRNA as anticancer agents.

Novel Regulatory B cells for Treatment of Cancer and Autoimmune Disease

Cancer cells have been found to directly activate resting B cells to form suppressive regulatory B cells (tBregs) and utilize them to evade immune surveillance and mediate metastasis. tBregs directly inhibit CD4+ and CD8+ T cell activity in a cell contact-dependent manner, induce FoxP3+ T cell activity, and promote Treg-dependent metastasis. The National Institute on Aging's Immunotherapeutics Unit, is seeking parties interested in licensing or co-development of regulatory B cells to control autoimmune diseases and strategies that inactivate tBregs to control cancer immune escape. 

Novel Murine T-Cell Receptors for Treating Metastatic Thyroid Cancer

Metastatic thyroid cancer can be resistant to current treatment options such as radioactive iodine therapy. Targeting thyroglobulin, a thyroid-specific antigen, as part of an adoptive cell therapy approach will allow for new therapeutic possibilities. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for novel T-cell receptors for the treatment of metastatic thyroid cancer.

Novel HPPK (Bacterial Protein) Inhibitors for Use as Antibacterial Agents

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed several novel small-molecule inhibitors directed against HPPK, a bacterial protein, as potential antimicrobial agents. The NCI seeks co-development partners or licensees to further develop these novel small-molecule HPPK inhibitors as broad-spectrum bactericidal agents.

Novel Fusion Proteins for HIV Vaccine

The National Cancer Institute’s Cancer and Inflammation Program seeks parties to license gp120 and CD4-induced antibody fusion proteins for use in an HIV vaccine.

Novel Fixative for Improved Biomolecule Quality from Paraffin-Embedded Tissue

Researchers in the National Cancer Institute’s Laboratory of Pathology have developed an improved tissue fixative solution that is formaldehyde-free. This novel fixative, BE70, significantly improves DNA, RNA, and protein biomolecule integrity in histological samples compared to traditional fixatives. Additionally, BE70 is compatible with current protocols and does not alter tissue processing. NCI seeks partners to license this technology.

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