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Design and Biological Activity of Novel Stealth Polymeric Lipid Nanoparticles for Enhanced Delivery of Hydrophobic Photodynamic Therapy Drugs

Scientists at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed a novel stealth lipid-based nanoparticle formulation comprising phospholipid, DC8,9PC and a polyethylene glycol-ated (PEGylated) lipid – such as DSPE-PEG2000 – that efficiently package a high amounts of hydrophobic photodynamic drug (PDT) – such as HPPH – in stable vesicles. This HPPH-loaded liposome system demonstrates higher serum stability and ambient temperature stability upon storage. It exhibits increased tumor accumulation and improved animal survival in mice tumor models compared to the formulation in current clinical trials. The NCI seeks co-development partners and/or corporate licensees for the application of the technology as an anti-cancer therapeutic.

Denoising of Dynamic Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging Using Low Rank Approximations in the Kinetic Domain

Scientists at The National Cancer Institute (NCI) and The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) have invented a method of imaging glucose metabolism in vivo using MRI chemical shift imaging (CSI) experiments that relies on a simple, but robust and efficient, post-processing procedure by the higher dimensional analog of singular value decomposition, tensor decomposition. This new technology is denoising software for MRIs that significantly improves the measurement of low-intensity signals without the need for dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP). The scientists seek research co-development partners and/or licensees for their invention.

Computer-Aided Diagnostic for Use in Multiparametric MRI for Prostate Cancer

Researchers at the National Institutes for Health Clinical Center (NIHCC) have developed computer-aided diagnostics (CAD) that may further improve the already superior capabilities of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for detection and imaging of prostate cancer. This system produces an accurate probability map of potential cancerous lesions in multiparametric MRI images that is superior to other systems and may have multiple product applications.

Combination Therapy for Prostate and Breast Cancer

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute developed a novel method of immunogenic modulation in androgen and endocrine deprivation therapy. A combination of hormone therapy with immunotherapies such as PROSTVAC™, a Brachyury vaccine, PROVENGE™, ipilumimab, nivolumab, XOFIGO™, PANVAC, a yeast-MUC-1 immunotherapeutic, or HERCEPTIN™ can benefit prostate and breast cancer patients, especially those who have acquired resistances. The researchers seek parties to co-develop this method.

Combination of Near Infrared Photoimmunotherapy Targeting Cancer Cells and Host-Immune Activation

Investigators at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) seek co-development partners and/or licensees for a new therapeutic approach that selectively targets cancer cells and prevents tumor regrowth. The novel method combines antibody-IR700 molecules and Near-Infrared Photo Immunotherapy (NIR-PIT), which has shown great potential in targeting tumors via a host immunogenic response, with already known and available anti-cancer immunomodulators to further enhance the antitumor response. The investigators have shown in mouse models that, when used in combination, NIR-PIT-treatment and standard antitumor agents conferred a potent vaccine-like effect, not only curing mice of local and distant cancers but successfully immunizing them against tumor regrowth.

Combination Cancer Therapy with HDAC Inhibitors

NCI researchers developed a combination therapy of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors and immunotherapies, such as checkpoint inhibitors, virus-based vaccines, monoclonal antibodies, cell-based treatments or radiopharmaceuticals. The NCI Laboratory of Tumor Immunology and Biology seeks parties to license or co-develop this method.

Coacervate Micoparticles Useful for the Sustained Release of Therapeutic Agents

Researchers at the National Institute on Aging (NIA) have discovered novel microparticles that are formed using a coacervation process; the biodegradable microbead or microparticle is useful for the sustained localized delivery of biologically active proteins or other molecules of pharmaceutical interest. The microparticles have a matrix structure comprised of the reaction product of at least one cationic polymer, at least one anionic polymer, and a binding component (e.g. gelatin, chondroitin sulfate, avidin).

Clinical Outcome Predictors for Mantle Cell Lymphoma

The invention is a novel methodology for predicting a mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) cancer patient’s survival prognosis. This information is important in helping determine the best course of treatment for the patient.

Clinical Imaging with Acoustic Wave or Photoacoustic Tomosynthesis

Ultrasound-based cancer screening and biopsy imaging technique are a critical clinical need. Ultrasound based biopsy imaging can provide a real-time modality for lower cost that is comparable to, or complimentary to MRI imaging. Researchers at the NIH Clinical Center seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for Tissue Characterization with Acoustic Wave Tomosynthesis.

Chimeric Antigen Receptors to CD276 for Treating Cancer

This licensing opportunity from the National Cancer Institute concerns the development of CARs comprising an antigen-binding fragment derived from the MGA271 antibody. The resulting CARs can be used in adoptive cell therapy treatment for neuroblastoma and other tumors that express CD276.

Chimeric Antigen Receptors that Recognize Mesothelin for Cancer Immunotherapy

Researchers at the NCI have developed chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) with a high affinity for mesothelin to be used as an immunotherapy to treat pancreatic cancer, ovarian cancer, and mesothelioma. Cells that express CARs, most notably T cells, are highly reactive against their specific tumor antigen in an MHC-unrestricted manner to generate an immune response that promotes robust tumor cell elimination when infused into cancer patients.

Chimeric Adaptor Proteins (CAPs) Containing a Linker for Activation of T Cells (LAT) and a Kinase Domain for Use in T Cell-Based Immunotherapy

There remains a need for effective immunotherapies to treat solid tumors as well as hematological malignancies. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have designed novel chimeric adaptor proteins (CAPs) consisting of signaling molecules downstream of the T cell receptor (TCR) for use in T cell-mediated immunotherapy. NCI is seeking parties interested in licensing and/or co-developing CAPs that can be used in immunotherapy for treating cancer, including both hematological and solid malignancies.

Cell Lines Expressing Nuclear and/or Mitochondrial RNAse H1

The National Institute of Child Health & Human Development (NICHD), Program in Genomics of Differentiation, seeks interested parties to further co-develop small molecule inhibitors of RNase H1, especially in regards to genome instability, transcription, and translation.

Cell Line for Production of Recombinant Human Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-2

Recombinant human tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (rhTIMP-2) have been shown to suppress tumor growth and tumor-associated angiogenesis. NCI Radiation Oncology Branch (ROB) researchers have developed a unique HEK-293F cell line which stably expresses rhTIMP-2, increasing the production of TIMP-2 to quantities sufficient to be used for testing and development as a therapeutic for various cancers, ischemic diseases (myocardial infarct and cerebrovascular infarct), and neurodegenerative diseases.

Cancer-reactive T cells from Peripheral Blood

T-cells capable of reacting to mutations in cancer patients have potential use as therapeutics. Identifying and isolating these cells from patients is a crucial step in developing these treatments. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a novel method of isolating mutation-reactive T-cells from a patient’s peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL). The NCI, Surgery Branch, is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize this method of isolating mutation-reactive T-cells from peripheral blood.

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