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CD206 Small Molecule Modulators, Their Use and Methods for Preparation

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have discovered a small molecule that binds to CD206 and activates M2-like tumor associated macrophages resulting in innate and adaptive anti-tumor responses. NCI seeks research co-development or licensees for CD206 small molecule modulators as a therapeutic for CD206-expressing cancers (such as pancreatic, sarcoma, head and neck, lung, gastric, triple negative breast, renal cell, colorectal cancer, melanoma).

Synergistic Use of Exo VII Inhibitors And Quinolone Antibiotics For Treating Bacterial Infection

Scientists at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have discovered a bacterial exonuclease VII (ExoVII) inhibitor that increases the potency of widely used quinolone antibiotics targeting prokaryotic type IIA topoisomerases. NCI seeks research co-development partners and/or licensees for the development of ExoVII inhibitors as new antibiotic adjuvants to boost the efficacy of quinolone antibiotics and/or restore the susceptibility of resistant bacteria.

New Heterocyclic Scaffold-Based Inhibitors of the Polo-Box Domain of Polo-like Kinase 1 for the Treatment of Cancer

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) have developed novel heterocyclic scaffold-based inhibitors of the polo-box domain (PBD) of Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1). These compounds effectively arrest mitotic progression and cell proliferation in cell-based assays. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations to further develop these inhibitors for the treatment of cancer.

Dual Specific Anti-CD22 Anti-CD19 Bicistronic Chimeric Antigen Receptors (CARs)

Inventors at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) that target two B cell surface antigens, CD19 and CD22, improving treatment of B-cell malignancies, such as acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). NCI is actively seeking parties interested in licensing this invention to commercialize the bicistronic CAR construct targeting CD19 and CD22 for immunotherapy.

T-cell Receptors (TCRs) Specific for p53 Mutants

National Cancer Institute (NCI) researchers have isolated T-cell receptors (TCRs) reactive to the highly prevalent p53-Y220C and p53-R273C mutants. These TCRs can be used for a variety of therapeutic, diagnostic and research applications. NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for TCRs that recognize p53-Y220C and p53- R273C mutations, and methods for identifying p53 mutation-reactive T cell receptors.

Methods of Producing Thymic Emigrants from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

Pluripotent stem cells are a promising source of T cells for a variety of clinical applications. However, current in vitro methods of T cell differentiation result in the generation of cells with aberrant phenotypes. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have now developed methodology for generating induced pluripotent stem cell thymic emigrants (iTE). Antigen-specific CD8αβ+ iTEs exhibited functional properties in vitro that were almost indistinguishable from natural naïve CD8αβ+ T cells, including vigorous expansion and robust anti-tumor activity. iTEs recapitulated many of the transcriptional programs of naïve T cells in vivo and revealed a striking capacity for engraftment, memory formation, and efficient tumor destruction. The NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for this invention.

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