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Mouse Embryo Culture Chamber and Imaging System and Methods of Use

Scientists at the National Eye Institute (NEI) have developed an embryo culture chamber, which can be used to culture and image embryos. The chamber allows for the continuous imaging of the embryo for the culture period. NEI seeks research collaborations and/or licensees for the development of this culture and imaging chamber for murine embryos.

Mitotic Figures Electronic Counting Application for Surgical Pathology

National Cancer Institute (NCI) researchers have developed a novel software tool for uniform recording of Mitotic Figure (MF) counts via conventional and/or digital microscopy. With this technology, diagnostic centers can standardize electronic recording, summation, and transcription of clinical data during surgical pathology examination. NCI seeks licensing partners to further develop this application for use in diagnosis and detection of malignant cancers.

Automated Cancer Diagnostic Tool of Detecting, Quantifying and Mapping Mitotically-Active Proliferative Cells in Tumor Tissue Histopathology Whole-Slide Images

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks research, co-development, or licensing partners for software that uses computational approaches in cancer diagnosis. NCI researchers have recently developed a computational approach for detecting, quantifying, and mapping Mitotic Hotspots in whole slide images of tumor tissue. This technology has demonstrated high reproducibility that is unaffected by diagnostic skill or fatigue, allowing standardization of tumor cell proliferation assessment across institutions.

Chimeric Adaptor Proteins (CAPs) Containing a Linker for Activation of T Cells (LAT) and a Kinase Domain for Use in T Cell-Based Immunotherapy

There remains a need for effective immunotherapies to treat solid tumors as well as hematological malignancies. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have designed novel chimeric adaptor proteins (CAPs) consisting of signaling molecules downstream of the T cell receptor (TCR) for use in T cell-mediated immunotherapy. NCI is seeking parties interested in licensing and/or co-developing CAPs that can be used in immunotherapy for treating cancer, including both hematological and solid malignancies.

EGFRvIII Antibodies for the Treatment of Human Cancer

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have isolated seven monoclonal antibodies that bind to the human epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII) but not wildtype EGFR. The NCI seeks research co-development partners or licensees for monoclonal antibodies that specifically target cancer-expressed EGFR.

Peptide Hydrogels for Rate-Controlled Delivery of Therapeutics

Scientists at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a novel delivery platform in which the scaffold of an anionic hydrogel (AcVES3) can be attenuated to deliver therapeutic small molecules, peptides, proteins, nanoparticles, or whole cells. The NCI seeks collaborators and licensees for the development of this technology in various clinical and laboratory applications.

Detection of Novel Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals in Water Supplies

Testing for biological activity of glucocorticoids and many other steroid endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) has not been previously performed. An automated, highly reproducible, and low cost assay detects biologically active steroidal EDCs and is suitable for wide application in testing water samples. The National Cancer Institute seeks partners for collaborative co-development research and/or licensing to move this technology into the public domain.

A Novel Genetically Encoded Inhibitor of Hippo Signaling Pathway to Study YAP1/TAZ-TEAD Dependent Events in Cancer

The Hippo signaling pathway is one of the most frequently altered pathways in human cancer. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a genetically encoded peptide inhibitor of the Hippo signaling pathway members YAP1/TAZ-TEAD, to dissect and study the specific TEAD-downstream regulatory gene expression networks of cell proliferation, tissue homeostasis, and stem cell functions in different cell types and pathologies. The DNA construct encoding this inhibitor may be delivered to cells using lentivirus, adenovirus, or adeno-associated virus, and is a valuable research tool. NCI seeks licensees for this peptide inhibitor and the encoding DNA construct.

Methods of Producing T-cell Populations Using P38 MAPK Inhibitors

Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) uses cancer reactive T-cells to effectively treat cancer patients. Producing many persistent T-cells is critical for successful treatments. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a method of producing larger populations of minimally-differentiated T-cells. NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations to further develop, evaluate, and/or commercialize this novel method of producing effective T-cell populations using p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitors.

Reprogrammed Tumor Infiltrated Lymphocytes for Efficient Identification of Tumor-Antigen Specific T-Cell Receptors

Adoptive T Cell Therapy (ACT) has proven to effectively treat established tumors. This treatment consists of harvesting Tumor Infiltrated Lymphocytes (TIL) which specifically recognize cancer, expanding the tumor-specific TIL in vitro, and then reinfusing these cells into the patient for treatment. Both these lymphocytes and their T cell receptors (TCR) are valuable for cancer immunotherapy. Inventors from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed an improved method to identify tumor-specific TCRs by reprogramming TIL into stem cells. This invention is available to license further development.

T-Cell Therapy Against Patient-Specific Cancer Mutations

Scientists at the National Cancer Institute developed a method to identify T cells that specifically recognize immunogenic mutations expressed only by cancer cells. NCI seeks parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop or license T-cell therapy against cancer mutations

A Viral Exposure Signature to Define and Detect Early Onset Hepatocellular Carcinoma

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have identified a biomarker signature of viral infection that correlates with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) incidence in at-risk individuals. It has been validated in a longitudinal cohort to detect HCC with high sensitivity and specificity up to 7 years prior to clinical diagnosis. This viral exposure signature can be easily implemented into diagnostic assays for screening of HCC and is available for licensing and/or co-development opportunities.

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