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A peptide hydrogel for use in vascular anastomosis

Surgery specialists from Johns Hopkins University, in collaboration with researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), developed peptide hydrogel compositions and methods to suture blood vessels during microsurgery. The hydrogels particularly benefit surgeons in whole tissue transplant procedures. The NCI seeks co-development research collaborations for further development of this technology.

Polymeric Delivery Platform for Therapeutics

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for a polymeric drug delivery platform that targets scavenger receptor A1 (SR-A1), a receptor highly expressed in macrophages, monocytes, mast cells, dendritic cells (myeloid lineages), and endothelial cells. The platform delivers various immunomodulatory therapeutic cargo including small molecule drugs, therapeutic peptides, and vaccines, to the lymphatic system and myeloid/antigen presenting cell (APC) sub-populations.

Overexpression of Phf19 on T Cells Enhances Therapeutic Effects of T Cell-Based Therapies (such as Chimeric Antigen Receptor [CAR] Therapies)

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a method to epigenetically reprogram CD8+ T cell fate by expressing elevated levels of the polycomb-like protein, Phf19. This technology is useful for improving T cell-based immunotherapies (such as CAR therapies) to treat a range of infectious diseases and cancers. NCI seeks licensing or co-development partners for this invention.

Novel Murine T-Cell Receptors for Treating Metastatic Thyroid Cancer

Metastatic thyroid cancer can be resistant to current treatment options such as radioactive iodine therapy. Targeting thyroglobulin, a thyroid-specific antigen, as part of an adoptive cell therapy approach will allow for new therapeutic possibilities. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for novel T-cell receptors for the treatment of metastatic thyroid cancer.

Inhibition of T Cell Differentiation and Senescence by Overexpression of Transcription Factor c-Myb

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a method by which memory T cells can be generated from other T cell populations using overexpression of the transcription factor c-Myb. Importantly, these reprogrammed memory T cells show increased proliferative and survival capacity. This strategy could also potentially generate anti-tumor T cells with improved viability and therapeutic efficacy for adoptive ACT. Researchers at the NCI seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for this invention.

RNA/DNA Nanoparticles as Cancer Therapeutics

The technology is directed to the use of single-stranded RNA overhangs or toeholds of varying lengths (< 12 nucleotides) contained in nucleic acid-based nanoparticles which trigger the association of these nanoparticles and activates multiple functionalities such as gene silencing and/or cell-specific targeting. The use of RNA toeholds is superior to that of DNA toeholds in that it allows for smaller nanoparticles (fewer nucleotides for the toeholds) resulting in greater chemical stability, less immunogenic and higher yield of production. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for use of RNA overhangs or toeholds in nucleic acid nanoparticles.

Fusion Proteins as HIV-1 Entry Inhibitors

Novel fusion proteins with good stability and potency against HIV-1. These fusion proteins have good drug properties and potential as prophylactics or therapeutics against HIV-1 infection. Researchers at the NCI seek licensing for the development and commercialization of novel fusion proteins as therapeutics or prophylactics against HIV-1 infection.

Improved HIV Vaccines Through Ras Activation

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Vaccine Branch, seeks research co-development or licenses for a novel method of improving HIV vaccine efficacy by activating Ras signaling. Upregulating the Ras pathway can improve an HIV patient’s immune response to anti-retroviral vaccines.

Enhanced Immunogenicity Against HIV-1 Using a DNA-prime Poxvirus Vaccination

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) seek research co-development or licenses for a method of stimulating an immune response in a human at risk for infection by, or already infected with, an HIV-1 retrovirus. This method utilizes DNA vaccines to stimulate CD8+ T cell immune responses.

New Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) Format for Developing Improved Adoptive Cell Therapies

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a new format for expressing Chimeric Antigen Receptors (CARs) that is available for licensing and co-development. The inventors found that there was an increased therapeutic effect when using their proprietary (anti-glypican 3 [GPC3]) hYP7 antibody in this format. The novel technology is useful for improving CAR therapies to treat a range of cancers.

Methods for Producing Stem Cell-Like Memory T Cells for Use in T Cell-Based Immunotherapies

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) seek research & co-development and/or licensees for a novel, ex vivo method by which stem cell-like memory T cells (Tscm) can be generated by stimulating naïve T cells in the presence of inhibitors of GSK-3beta, which are capable of activating the Wnt pathway. These Tscm cells, generated using GSK-3beta inhibitors, display enhanced survival and proliferation upon transfer, have multipotent capacity to generate all memory and effector T cell subsets, and show increased anti-tumor activity in a humanized mouse tumor model.

Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 4 (FGFR4) Monoclonal Antibodies and Methods of Their Use

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed several high-affinity monoclonal antibodies to treat Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 4 (FGFR4)-related diseases including rhabdomyosarcoma and cancers of the liver, lung, pancreas, ovary and prostate. These antibodies have been used to generate antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) and chimeric antigen receptors (CARs), which are capable of specifically targeting and killing diseased cells. NCI seeks co-development opportunities or licensees for this technology.

Methods For Treating or Preventing Inflammation and Periodontitis

Natural products have long been considered a source of biologically active molecules against health disorders, including bone-loss related diseases. Cinnamolyoxy-mammeisin (CNM), can be isolated from Brazilian geopropolis and demonstrates anti-inflammatory activity. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), in collaboration with researchers at the Piracicaba Dental School, University of Campinas, Brazil, have shown CNM also demonstrates inhibition of oral bone loss. This invention is available for licensing and/or co-development opportunities.

Bile Acids and Other Agents that Modulate the Gut Microbiome for the Treatment of Liver Cancer

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have discovered that primary bile acids and antibiotics are a novel therapeutic for the treatment of liver cancer and liver metastases. NCI is seeking parties interested in licensing and/or co-developing primary bile acids and antibiotics that have been demonstrated in vivo to attract natural killer T (NKT) cells to the liver and inhibit tumor development.

Tethered Interleukin-15 (IL-15)/IL-21 to Enhance T Cells for Cellular Therapy

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a method to improve the function of therapeutic engineered T cells used for Adoptive T Cell Therapy (ACT) for various cancers and diseases through the co-expression of Interleukin-15 (IL-15) and IL-21 by a flexible linker to the cell membrane. Researchers at the NCI seek licensing for this invention.

T cell Receptors Which Recognize Mutated EGFR

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have isolated T cell receptors (TCRs) that target specific mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). The mutated protein recognized by these TCRs is frequently expressed in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). These TCRs can be used for a variety of therapeutic applications, including engineered adoptive cell immunotherapy. Researchers at the NCI seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for these novel T cell receptors that recognize EGFR mutations.

The UBE2G2 Binding Domain in the Ubiquitin Ligase GP78 and Methods of Use Thereof

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed an invention describing the binding domain (G2BD) for the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Ube2G2 in the gp78 ubiqutin ligase protein. The invention involves modulating the interaction between the gp78 protein and the conjugating enzyme Ube2G2. Interruption of this interaction will block degradation from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), resulting in ER stress, unfolded protein response, and, ultimately, apoptosis in some cancer cells. The NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development partners for this invention.

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