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Human T Cell Receptors for Treating Cancer

T cell receptors (TCRs) are proteins that recognize antigens in the context of infected or transformed cells and activate T cells to mediate an immune response and destroy abnormal cells. The National Cancer Institute's Surgery Branch seeks interested parties to license or co-develop the use of T cell receptors (TCRs) cloned against the SSX-2 antigen for the treatment of cancer.

Knockout and Conditional Knockout Mice-GPR116

Pulmonary surfactant plays a critical role in preventing alveolar collapse by decreasing surface tension at the alveolar air-liquid interface. Surfactant deficiency contributes to the pathogenesis of acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), common disorders that can afflict patients of all ages and carry a mortality rate greater than 25%. Excess surfactant leads to pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. NCI investigators created a G-protein coupled receptor GPR116 mutant mouse model and showed that GPR116 plays a previously unexpected, essential role in maintaining normal surfactant levels in the lung. The National Cancer Institute seeks partners interested in collaborative research to license surfactant modulating agents for the treatment of surfactant related lung disorders.

Novel Anti-HIV Proteins from Coral Reefs

Scientists at the National Cancer Institute's Molecular Targets Laboratory have discovered that Cnidarins as a novel class of highly potent proteins capable of blocking the HIV virus from penetrating T-cells. The National Cancer Institute seeks parties interested in collaborative research to license or co-develop large-scale recombinant production of cnidarins.

Assays for Measuring and Quantifying DNA Damage

The National Cancer Institute seeks partners interested in licensing or co-development of assays for determining the levels of gamma-H2AX/H2AX to measure and quantify DNA damage.

Topical Antibiotic for Faster Wound Healing

Currently available topical antibiotic formulations effectively eliminate bacteria at a wound site. Eliminating bacteria in the wound also eliminates the molecular signals present in bacterial DNA that stimulate the immune system's wound healing processes. Without these signals, the rate of wound healing is diminished.  The National Cancer Institute Laboratory of Experimental Immunology seeks parties interested in licensing a topical antibiotic formulation to accelerate wound healing.

Multifunctional RNA Nanoparticles as Cancer and HIV Therapeutics

The promise of RNA interference based therapeutics is made evident by the recent surge of biotechnological drug companies that pursue such therapies and their progression into human clinical trials. The present technology discloses novel RNA  and RNA/DNA nanoparticles including multiple siRNAs, RNA aptamers, fluorescent dyes, and proteins. The National Cancer Institute sees parties interested licensing this technology  or in collaborative research to co-develop RNAi-based nanoparticle therapeutics for cancer and HIV.

Mouse Xenograft Model for Mesothelioma

The National Cancer Institute is seeking parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop, evaluate, or commercialize a new mouse model for monoclonal antibodies and immunoconjugates that target malignant mesotheliomas. Applications of the technology include models for screening compounds as potential therapeutics for mesothelioma and for studying the pathology of mesothelioma.

Modulating Chemotherapeutic Cytotoxicity

The NCI seeks partners interested in in-licensing or co-development collaboration on CD47-targeting therapeutics for cardioprotection and autophagy modulation.

Synthetic lipopeptide inhibitors of RAS oncoproteins

It is well known that overactive Ras signaling is linked to many forms of cancer, and despite intensive efforts worldwide to develop effective inhibitors of Ras, to date there is no anti-Ras inhibitor in clinical use. Researchers at the NCI’s Cancer and Inflammation Program, in collaboration with scientists at Vanderbilt University and the University of Illinois in Chicago, have identified a number of small peptidomimetic compounds that bind to Ras proteins with nanomolar affinity. NCI’s Cancer and Inflammation Program seeks partners interested in licensing or co-development of synthetic, highly potent cell-permeable inhibitors of Ras that bind to the protein directly.

Novel Fixative for Improved Biomolecule Quality from Paraffin-Embedded Tissue

Researchers in the National Cancer Institute’s Laboratory of Pathology have developed an improved tissue fixative solution that is formaldehyde-free. This novel fixative, BE70, significantly improves DNA, RNA, and protein biomolecule integrity in histological samples compared to traditional fixatives. Additionally, BE70 is compatible with current protocols and does not alter tissue processing. NCI seeks partners to license this technology.

Small Molecule Inhibitors of Drug Resistant Forms of HIV-1 Integrase

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute discovered small-molecule compounds whose activity against HIV-1 integrase mutants confer greater resistance than currently approved INSTIs. Preliminary DMPK and ADME studies have been completed by the NCI researchers. The National Cancer Institute seeks partners to commercialize this class of compounds through licensing or co-development.

Anti-bacterial Treatments Using Peptide-Based Inhibitors of the STAT3-IL10 Pathway

Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious disease that typically affects the lungs. Current therapies include a panel of antibiotics given over a range of 6-9 months. As a result of the expense of treatment, the extended timeframe needed for effective treatment, and the scarcity of medicines in some developing countries, patient compliance with TB treatment is very low and results in multi-drug resistant TB (MDR-TB). There remains a need for a faster, more effective treatment for TB. NCI researchers seek licensing and/or co-development of peptide inhibitors of STAT3 and IL-10 developed to treat bacterial infections such as tuberculosis. See aslo: NIH inventions E-164-2007 and E-167-2010

Griffithsin-Based Anti-viral Therapeutics with Improved Stability and Solubility

Scientists at the National Cancer Institute's Molecular Targets Laboratory have modified the Cnidarin-derived griffithsin compound to have greater storage time and stability. Griffithsin compounds are a class of highly potent proteins capable of blocking the HIV virus from penetrating T cells. The National Cancer Institute seeks parties interested in collaborative research to license or co-develop large-scale recombinant production of the compound.

Use of Heterodimeric IL-15 in Adoptive Cell Transfer

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a technology that provides methods of performing adoptive cell transfer (ACT), an immunotherapeutic approach for cancer treatment, by administering a heterodimeric Interleukin 15/Interleukin 15 receptor alpha (IL-15/IL-15Rα) complex (hetlL-15) in the absence of lymphodepletion, thereby eliminating any lymphodepletion-associated detrimental side effects.

Antibody and Immunotoxin Treatments for Mesothelin-expressing Cancers

The National Cancer Institute Laboratory of Molecular Biology is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in licensing or collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize antibody-based treatments of mesothelin-expressing cancers.

Nanoparticle delivery of lung cancer therapeutic

The National Cancer Institute seeks parties interested in licensing an improved treatment for non-small cell lung cancer based on inhalation of nano- and microparticle therapeutics.

In silico design of RNA nanoparticles

The National Cancer Institute seeks parties interested in licensing or collaborative research to co-develop RNA nanostructures using computational and synthetic methods.

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