You are here

Share:

Search Technologies

Showing 281-300 of 367 results found

Substrate Reduction Therapy for Smith-Lemli-Opitz Syndrome and Related Disorders

The Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) is seeking parties interested in co-development or licensing a substrate reduction therapy for Smith-Lemli-Opitz Syndrome (SLOS) and other diseases which have a secondary Niemann-Pick type C disease like cellular phenotype.

Methods of Producing T-cell Populations Using P38 MAPK Inhibitors

Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) uses cancer reactive T-cells to effectively treat cancer patients. Producing many persistent T-cells is critical for successful treatments. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a method of producing larger populations of minimally-differentiated T-cells. NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations to further develop, evaluate, and/or commercialize this novel method of producing effective T-cell populations using p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitors.

A Novel Genetically Encoded Inhibitor of Hippo Signaling Pathway to Study YAP1/TAZ-TEAD Dependent Events in Cancer

The Hippo signaling pathway is one of the most frequently altered pathways in human cancer. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a genetically encoded peptide inhibitor of the Hippo signaling pathway members YAP1/TAZ-TEAD, to dissect and study the specific TEAD-downstream regulatory gene expression networks of cell proliferation, tissue homeostasis, and stem cell functions in different cell types and pathologies. The DNA construct encoding this inhibitor may be delivered to cells using lentivirus, adenovirus, or adeno-associated virus, and is a valuable research tool. NCI seeks licensees for this peptide inhibitor and the encoding DNA construct.

Inhibition of T Cell Differentiation and Senescence by Overexpression of Transcription Factor c-Myb

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a method by which memory T cells can be generated from other T cell populations using overexpression of the transcription factor c-Myb. Importantly, these reprogrammed memory T cells show increased proliferative and survival capacity. This strategy could also potentially generate anti-tumor T cells with improved viability and therapeutic efficacy for adoptive ACT. Researchers at the NCI seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for this invention.

Methods for Producing Stem Cell-Like Memory T Cells for Use in T Cell-Based Immunotherapies

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) seek research & co-development and/or licensees for a novel, ex vivo method by which stem cell-like memory T cells (Tscm) can be generated by stimulating naïve T cells in the presence of inhibitors of GSK-3beta, which are capable of activating the Wnt pathway. These Tscm cells, generated using GSK-3beta inhibitors, display enhanced survival and proliferation upon transfer, have multipotent capacity to generate all memory and effector T cell subsets, and show increased anti-tumor activity in a humanized mouse tumor model.

Topical Antibiotic for Faster Wound Healing

Currently available topical antibiotic formulations effectively eliminate bacteria at a wound site. Eliminating bacteria in the wound also eliminates the molecular signals present in bacterial DNA that stimulate the immune system's wound healing processes. Without these signals, the rate of wound healing is diminished.  The National Cancer Institute Laboratory of Experimental Immunology seeks parties interested in licensing a topical antibiotic formulation to accelerate wound healing.

Cancer Therapeutic based on Stimulation of Natural Killer T-cell Anti-tumor Activity

Investigators at the National Cancer Institute''s Vaccine Branch have found that beta-mannosylceramide (Beta-ManCer) promotes immunity in an IFN-gamma independent mechanism and seek statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize beta-ManCer.

Multivalent Immunogenic Vaccines for Treating Prostate and Breast Cancer

Researchers at the NCI have developed a treatment for prostate and breast cancer using multivalent peptides derived from TARP, the T cell receptor gamma alternate reading frame protein. These immunogenic peptides from TARP elicit an immune response, triggering T cells to kill only the cancer cells within a patient. NCI seeks licensees or co-development partners to commercialize this invention.

Hydrocarbon Stapled Peptides that Inhibit the Linear Ubiquitin Chain Assembly Complex (LUBAC) for the Therapy of the Activated B Cell-like (ABC) Subtype of Diffuse Large B Bell Lymphoma (A Type of Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma)

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed an invention consisting of hydrocarbon stapled peptides that disrupt the linear ubiquitin-chain assembly complex (LUBAC), which is involved in NF-κB signaling. These peptides can be used as a therapeutic in the treatment of the activated B cell-like (ABC) subtype of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL), a type of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, as well as inflammatory diseases. The NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for inhibitors of NF-κB signaling and/or treatment of ABC DLBCL, as well as inflammatory diseases.

Nucleic Acid Nanoparticles for Triggering RNA Interference

RNA interference (RNAi) is a naturally occurring cellular post-transcriptional gene regulation process that utilizes small double-stranded RNAs to trigger and guide gene silencing. By introducing synthetic RNA duplexes called small-interfering RNAs (siRNAs), we can harness the RNAi machinery for therapeutic gene control and the treatment of various diseases. The National Cancer Institute seeks partners to license or co-develop RNA, RNA-DNA, and DNA-RNA hybrid nanoparticles consisting of a DNA or RNA core with attached RNA or DNA hybrid duplexes.

Non-invasive Methods for Characterizing Adrenocortical Tumors

Researchers at the NCI developed a non-invasive method for distinguishing benign from malignant adrenocortical tumors using urine samples. The NCI seeks parties to co-develop a non-invasive, diagnostic method of distinguishing between benign and malignant adrenocortical tumors through the analysis of metabolites using urine samples.

Analogues of Withanolide E Sensitize Cancer Cells Toward Apoptosis

There is a need to develop compounds that can sensitize cancer cells to apoptosis inducing ligands, such as poly I:C and TRAIL. In collaboration with the University of Arizona, NCI investigators discovered a series of compounds in the withanolide family that synergistically enhance the response of cancer cells to treatment with an apoptosis-inducing ligand. The NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for development of withanolide E analogues for the treatment of cancer.

Ex-vivo Production of Regulatory B-Cells for Use in Auto-immune Diseases

Regulatory B-cells (Breg) play an important role in reducing autoimmunity and reduced levels of these cells are implicated in etiology of several auto-inflammatory diseases. Despite their impact in many diseases, their physiological inducers are unknown.  The National Eye Institute seeks parties interested in licensing or collaborative research to co-develop a process for the production of regulatory B-Cells for use in auto-immune indications.