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Devices for Improved Tissue Cryopreservation and Recovery

Researchers at the National Eye Institute (NEI), have developed a cryopreservation and cell recovery system designed specifically for the efficient cryopreservation, transportation and subsequent thawing of monolayers and tissues on a substrate. This closed cryopreservation/defrost system allows for sterility in addition to increased viability, recovery and safety of tissues that can be used for in vitro culture or surgical transplantation.

Tissue Clamp for Repeated Opening and Closure of Incisions/Wounds

This surgical clamp device is particularly useful for intraocular surgeries requiring incision in the sclera. The device provides ease of use for repeated opening and closure of an incision or wound for entry of instruments into the eye. It maintains precise alignment of the wound margins, reducing loss of intraocular fluid and pressure. The NEI seeks licensees or collaborative co-development of this invention so that it can be commercialized.

Ex-vivo Production of Regulatory B-Cells for Use in Auto-immune Diseases

Regulatory B-cells (Breg) play an important role in reducing autoimmunity and reduced levels of these cells are implicated in etiology of several auto-inflammatory diseases. Despite their impact in many diseases, their physiological inducers are unknown.  The National Eye Institute seeks parties interested in licensing or collaborative research to co-develop a process for the production of regulatory B-Cells for use in auto-immune indications.

Sterculic Acid Treatment for Choroidal Neovascularization

The National Eye Institute (NEI) Laboratory of Retinal Cell and Molecular Biology is seeking parties interested in licensing use of sterculic acid and its derivatives for the treatment of diseases related to angiogenesis or mediated by 7-ketocholesterol-induced inflammation, in particular, atherosclerosis, age-related macular degeneration, and Alzheimer''s disease.

Establishment of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSC) from the Thirteen-lined Ground Squirrel

Hibernation in mammals is a seasonal state of metabolic suppression and dormancy characterized by a decrease in body temperature to survive extreme environmental stresses. A new Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC) line has been established from the neural precursor cells of wild type thirteen-lined ground squirrel (Spermophilus tridecemlineatus), a small mammalian hibernator with unique metabolic adaptations for coping with cold and restricted food supply. This ground squirrel iPSC line can be differentiated into many different cell types for hibernation studies, disease modeling, and drug screening for neuronal injuries or other diseases.

Surgical Tool for Sub-retinal Tissue Implantation

Researchers at the National Eye Institute (NEI) developed a surgical tool to place tissue into position in the retina. The NEI seeks co-development or licensing to commercialize a prototype already in pre-manufacturing. Alternative uses will be considered.

Selective estrogen-receptor modulators (SERMs) confer protection against photoreceptor degeneration

Researchers at the National Eye Institute (NEI) have discovered a novel therapeutic strategy of using one or more selective estrogen-receptor modulators (SERMs), which may include the FDA-approved drug, Tamoxifen, for treating retinal degenerative diseases, like retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and age-related degeneration (AMD). SERMs exert their specific protection on photoreceptor degeneration likely by inhibiting microglial activation.

Interleukin 24 (IL-24) to treat inflammatory diseases

Researchers at the National Eye Institute (NEI) have developed a novel therapeutic strategy of using recombinant IL-24 protein to treat inflammatory diseases that involve the proinflammatory T-helper 17 cell (Th17) response, such as uveitis, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and Crohn’s disease. Researchers at the NEI seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for co-developing this technology as strategic partners or licensing it for commercialization.

3D Vascularized Human Ocular Tissue for Cell Therapy and Drug Discovery

Scientists at the National Eye Institute (NEI) have developed a technology for a 3D bioprinting process. Through the process, an artificial blood retinal barrier (BRB) is constructed that may be used as a graft to potentially replace BRB tissues that are lost or damaged in many ocular disorders. The printed tissue structures might be therapeutically useful for grafts or as model systems to test function and physiological responses to drugs or other variables introduced into the system.

Metformin for the Treatment of Age-related Retinal Degeneration

Researchers at the National Eye Institute (NEI) have generated Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPS) from two Late-Onset Reginal (L-ORD) patients with a dominant mutation in CTRP5 protein and two of their unaffected siblings. All iPS cells were differentiated into authenticated Retinal Pigment Epithelium (RPE) cells. The NEI seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for Metformin as an FDA-approved drug to treat Age-related Retinal Degeneration.

Use of Interleukin (IL)-34 to Treat Retinal Inflammation and Neurodegeneration

Researchers at the National Eye Institute have developed a new cytokine therapy that delivers functional interleukin 34 (IL-34) to the retina for treating ocular inflammatory diseases – such as uveitis and degenerative retinal diseases. Intraocular delivery of IL-34 protein or IL-34 gene expression system can effectively prevent retinal inflammation. Thus, it may be a promising strategy to produce long-lasting effects in suppressing abnormal retinal inflammation and preventing photoreceptor death.

RP2 and RPGR Vectors For Treating X-linked Retinitis Pigmentosa

The National Eye Institute (NEI) seek research co-development or licensees for advancing AAV8/9-based therapies for X-linked forms of retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP) caused by mutations in RPGR (retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator) or RP2 (retinitis pigmentosa 2) gene.

Newly Improved Method and Composition for Treating Genetically Linked Diseases of the Eye

To improve the transduction efficiency the inventors at the National Eye Institute (NEI) have developed a novel, non-invasive approach of applying electric current in combination with a gene therapy vector. This minimally invasive strategy significantly improves the transduction efficiency of AAV vectors in the mouse retina. This represents an improved method for restoring high levels of RS1 expression in the retina of X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS) patients. The NEI seeks a licensing and/or co-development partner to commercialize its AAV-RS1 Gene Therapy for XLRS.