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Bicistronic Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) Constructs Targeting CD19 and CD20

Chimeric Antigen Receptors (CARs) are engineered proteins that can be used in a therapeutic capacity when expressed by an immune cell (e.g., a T cell). Specifically, CARs comprise a targeting domain (such as an antibody or binding fragment thereof) as well as domains that activate immune cells. By selecting a targeting domain that binds to a protein that is selectively expressed on a cancer cell, it is possible to target immune cells to the cancer cells. Upon binding to the target cell, the immune cells are activated, leading to the destruction of the cancer cell. This therapeutic approach holds great promise, as evidenced by the recent FDA-approval of CAR-T cell therapies, KYMRIAH and YESCARTA, both of which target CD19.

New T-Cell Immunotherapy that Targets Aggressive Epithelial Tumors

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute’s Experimental Transplantation and Immunology Branch (NCI ETIB) developed a T Cell receptor that specifically targets the Kita-Kyushu Lung Cancer Antigen 1 (KK-LC-1) 52-60 epitope that is highly expressed by several common and aggressive epithelial tumor types.

High Affinity Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting Glypican-2 for Treating Childhood Cancers

Cancer therapies that specifically target Glypican 2 (GPC2) are strong therapeutic candidates for pediatric patients with neuroblastoma and other GPC2 expressing cancers. The inventors at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed and isolated two new antibodies that target GPC2 (CT3 and CT5) that are available for licensing and co-development.

Detection of Novel Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals in Water Supplies

Testing for biological activity of glucocorticoids and many other steroid endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) has not been previously performed. An automated, highly reproducible, and low cost assay detects biologically active steroidal EDCs and is suitable for wide application in testing water samples. The National Cancer Institute seeks partners for collaborative co-development research and/or licensing to move this technology into the public domain.

Module to Freeze and Store Frozen Tissue

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed an engineered storage unit for frozen tissue, that provides a permanent base on which to mount tissue frozen in OCT and an enclosure for storage. The unit provides for chain-of-custody labeling and acts as an insulating container to protect the specimen. Other elements include devices for freezing the tissue to the base, as well as a holder for the base to facilitate cryosectioning. Application of the storage system allows a frozen tissue specimen to be moved between storage and cryosectioning without loss of label, deformation of tissue, or thermal alterations.

Functionally-Interdependent Shape-Switching Nucleic Acid Nanoparticles

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed nucleic-acid-based nanoparticle that can be adapted for RNA interference (RNAi), molecular imaging, or a combination thereof. The invention nanoparticles can be used as therapeutics in the treatment of cancer, whichthe NCI seeks parties to license or co-develop.

Highly Soluble Pyrimido-Dione-Quinoline Compounds: Small Molecules that Stabilize and Activate p53 in Transformed Cells

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed an invention reporting the composition and function of a pyrimido-dione-quinoline that was found to inhibit HDM2’s ubiquitin ligase (E3) activity without accompanying genotoxicity. The current invention results in the stabilization of p53 in cells through the inhibition of its ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation resulting in a robust p53 response in tumors. NCI researchers seek licensing and/or co-development partners for this invention.

New Heterocyclic Scaffold-Based Inhibitors of the Polo-Box Domain of Polo-like Kinase 1 for the Treatment of Cancer

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) have developed novel heterocyclic scaffold-based inhibitors of the polo-box domain (PBD) of Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1). These compounds effectively arrest mitotic progression and cell proliferation in cell-based assays. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations to further develop these inhibitors for the treatment of cancer.

Exo-Clean Technology for Purifying Extracellular Vesicle Preparations from Contaminants

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed a novel biophysical technique to purify extracellular vesicles (EVs) from contaminants such as proteins and unbound labels. The NCI seeks licensees and/or co-development research collaborations to further advance this technology for EV-based biomarkers and therapeutics to treat a wide range of diseases.

Time Efficient Multi-Pulsed Field Gradient (mPFG) MRI Without Concomitant Gradient Field Artifacts

The Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) seeks research co-development partners and/or licensees for the development of diffusion tensor distribution imaging (DTD-MRI) in assessing disease (e.g., cancer), normal and abnormal developmental processes, degeneration and trauma in the brain and other soft tissues, and other applications.

Molecular Nanotags for Detection of Single Molecules

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed novel molecular nanotags for single biological nanoparticle detection, resolution, and sorting, by flow cytometry. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations to further advance this technology with extremely broad biomedical, biodefense, industrial, environmental, and other applications.

Peptide Mimetic Ligands of Polo-like Kinase 1 Polo Box Domain (“Plk1 PBD Portfolio”)

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed peptidomimetic inhibitors that disrupt Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1)-mediated protein interactions by targeting polo-box domain (PBD). These compounds are designed to selectively cause mitotic arrest in cancer cells with abnormal Plk1 expression. Researchers seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations to further develop the inhibitors.

Human Synovial Sarcoma Cell Line A2243

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks parties interested in licensing a human synovial sarcoma cell line (A2243). This cell line is an excellent research tool to study synovial sarcoma with a focus on chromosome translocations.

NSAIDs that Assist the Treatment of Human Diseases

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed compounds containing both a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) and a nitroxyl (HNO) -releasing agent that have significantly reduced toxicity, allowing their use for extended periods of time without severe side effects.The HNO-releasing moiety contained in this invention may expand the medical utility of NSAIDs. HNO releasing agents possess anticancer activity as well as good antioxidant properties, which has potential benefit for a variety of human diseases, including acute and chronic inflammation. NCI seeks parties to license or co-develop this technology.

Enhanced Cancer Chemotherapy Using the Bioactive Peptide Recifin And Its Analogues

Scientists at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) discovered that the cyclic peptide recifin inhibits the activity of tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 1 (TDP1), a molecular target for the sensitization of cancer cells to the topoisomerase 1 (TOP1) inhibitor camptothecin and its chemotherapeutic derivatives – such as topotecan and irinotecan. NCI seeks research co-development partners and/or licensees for the development of recifin and its analogues as new chemosensitizing agents in adjunct therapies to enhance the sensitivity of cancer cells to topotecan, irinotecan and related chemotherapeutic agents.

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