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Increased Therapeutic Effectiveness of PE-Based Immunotoxins

To improve the therapeutic effectiveness of PE-based immunotoxins through multiple rounds of drug administration, NIH inventors have sought to identify and remove the human B cell epitopes within PE. Previous work demonstrated that the removal of the murine B cell and T cell epitopes from PE reduced the immunogenicity of PE and resulted in immunotoxins with improved therapeutic activity. The National Cancer Institute's Laboratory of Molecular Biology seeks interested parties to co-develop and commercialize immunotoxins using toxin domains lacking human B cell epitopes.

Devices for Improved Tissue Cryopreservation and Recovery

Researchers at the National Eye Institute (NEI), have developed a cryopreservation and cell recovery system designed specifically for the efficient cryopreservation, transportation and subsequent thawing of monolayers and tissues on a substrate. This closed cryopreservation/defrost system allows for sterility in addition to increased viability, recovery and safety of tissues that can be used for in vitro culture or surgical transplantation.

Anti-CD133 Monoclonal Antibodies as Cancer Therapeutics

Researchers at NCI developed a rabbit monoclonal antibody that recognizes the marker for CD133 and is useful in pharmacodynamic testing to inform targeted anti-cancer chemotherapy development and clinical monitoring. CD133 is a cell surface glycoprotein used as a marker and expressed in stem cells such as hematopoietic stem cells, endothelial progenitor cells and neural stem cells. The NCI seeks collaborative co-development or licensing partners for this technology.

Improved Personalized Cancer Immunotherapy

The National Cancer Institute’s Surgery Branch seeks partners interested in collaborative research to co-develop adoptive transfer of tumor infiltrating leukocytes (TIL) for cancers other than melanoma.

Immunogenic Antigen Selective Cancer Immunotherapy

Researchers at the National Institute on Aging working on cancer immunotherapy and detection report the use of SPANX-B polypeptides in the treatment and identification of cancer. Specific human malignancies targeted for the treatments disclosed include melanoma and lung, colon, renal, ovarian and breast carcinomas. The NIA seeks parties interested in licensing or collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize SPANX-B polypeptides in the treatment and identification of cancer.

Functionally-Interdependent Shape-Switching Nucleic Acid Nanoparticles

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed nucleic-acid-based nanoparticle that can be adapted for RNA interference (RNAi), molecular imaging, or a combination thereof. The invention nanoparticles can be used as therapeutics in the treatment of cancer, whichthe NCI seeks parties to license or co-develop.

Phosphodiesterase as a target for cancer therapeutics

Investigators at the National Cancer Institute have discovered fluoroquinolone derivatives as specific Tdp1 inhibitors that could potentiate the pharmacological action of Top1 inhibitors currently used in cancer treatment.

Novel Fusion Proteins for HIV Vaccine

The National Cancer Institute’s Cancer and Inflammation Program seeks parties to license gp120 and CD4-induced antibody fusion proteins for use in an HIV vaccine.

Nitroxyl (HNO) Releasing Therapeutics

The National Cancer Institute's Cancer and Inflammation Program is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in licensing therapeutic agents that generate Nitroxyl (HNO) in physiological media.

Small Molecule Anti-cancer Agents that Stabilize the MYC-G-Quadruplex

The proto-oncogene c-Myc is deregulated and overexpressed in ~70% of all cancers. Thus, c-Myc is an attractive therapeutic target. Beyond cancer, Myc is also a positive effector of tissue inflammation, and its function has been implicated in the pathophysiology of heart failure. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed novel small molecules that target c-Myc at the transcriptional level, thus enabling a potential pan-cancer therapeutic. Specifically, these compounds stabilize the transcription repressing quadruplex in the c-Myc gene promoter region. The National Cancer Institute seeks parties interested in licensing or collaborative research to co-develop these therapeutic targets.'

Treating Hypertension Using Erythropoietin and its Derivatives

The Laboratory of Cardiovascular Science at the National Institute on Aging, is seeking parties interested in collaborative research to further co-develop a potential new hypertensive drug based on recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO).

Anti-Py1235-Met Immunological Binding Reagent as Cancer Diagnostic

This technology consists of highly specific rabbit monoclonal antibodies reactive with phosphorylated tyrosine located at amino acid 1235 in the human MET sequence. Binding to this pYl235 residue is independent of the phosphorylation of other tyrosines in the vicinity (1230 and 1234), does not cross-react with these nearby phosphotyrosine residues, and does not occur when Y1235 is unphosphorylated. Researchers at the NCI seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations  to commercialize and develop a companion diagnostic for selective MET inhibitors.

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