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Biofluorescent Colon Cancer Cell Line for Evaluation of Anti-Cancer Agents

Summary
Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a green fluorescent protein (GFP) expressing MC-38 colon adenocarcinoma cell line (MC-38-GFP) that can be used in preclinical studies to evaluate anti-cancer agents in colon cancer. NCI seeks parties to non-exclusively license this research material.
NIH Reference Number
E-152-2019
Product Type
Keywords
  • Colon Cancer, Cell Line Derived Xenograft, CDX, Green Fluorescent Protein, GFP, Biofluorescence, Intravital Imaging, Schlom
Collaboration Opportunity
This invention is available for licensing.
Contact
Description of Technology

Colorectal cancer (cancer that starts in the colon or rectum) is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States. There is a significant unmet need for improved therapies against this deadly disease – despite early detection increasing survival rates. 

Mouse models resembling the biological situation are necessary in the evaluation of chemotherapeutic or immunotherapeutic agents against colon cancer. The murine colon adenocarcinoma cell line, MC-38, was used to create the MC-38 cell line-derived xenograft model, which is widely used to study the proliferation of colon cancer. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed a green fluorescent protein (GFP) expressing MC-38 cell line (MC-38-GFP) that allows for intravital imaging to evaluate anti-cancer agents in colon cancer. 

The National Cancer Institute, Laboratory of Tumor Immunology and Biology, is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in licensing this research material to evaluate anti-cancer agents in colon cancer.

Potential Commercial Applications
  • Use in preclinical studies to evaluate anti-cancer agents in colon cancer 
Competitive Advantages
  • Biofluorescence allows for assessment of tumor progression after treatment with anti-cancer agents
  • Intravital imaging allows for temporal and spatial assessment of tumor growth in real time
Inventor(s)

Jeffrey Schlom Ph.D. (NCI), John W. Greiner Ph.D. (NCI)

Development Stage
Patent Status
  • Research Material: NIH will not pursue patent prosecution for this technology
Therapeutic Area
Updated
Wednesday, September 18, 2019