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Use of Interleukin (IL)-34 to Treat Retinal Inflammation and Neurodegeneration

Researchers at the National Eye Institute have developed a new cytokine therapy that delivers functional interleukin 34 (IL-34) to the retina for treating ocular inflammatory diseases – such as uveitis and degenerative retinal diseases. Intraocular delivery of IL-34 protein or IL-34 gene expression system can effectively prevent retinal inflammation. Thus, it may be a promising strategy to produce long-lasting effects in suppressing abnormal retinal inflammation and preventing photoreceptor death.

New Insect Sf9-ET Cell Line for Determining Baculovirus Titers

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks licensing partners for a novel modified insect cell line, Sf9-ET, that can quickly and efficiently determine baculovirus titers during the expression of recombinant proteins from a baculovirus-based protein expression system.

Ex-vivo Production of Regulatory B-Cells for Use in Auto-immune Diseases

Regulatory B-cells (Breg) play an important role in reducing autoimmunity and reduced levels of these cells are implicated in etiology of several auto-inflammatory diseases. Despite their impact in many diseases, their physiological inducers are unknown.  The National Eye Institute seeks parties interested in licensing or collaborative research to co-develop a process for the production of regulatory B-Cells for use in auto-immune indications.

NSAIDs that Assist the Treatment of Human Diseases

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed compounds containing both a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) and a nitroxyl (HNO) -releasing agent that have significantly reduced toxicity, allowing their use for extended periods of time without severe side effects.The HNO-releasing moiety contained in this invention may expand the medical utility of NSAIDs. HNO releasing agents possess anticancer activity as well as good antioxidant properties, which has potential benefit for a variety of human diseases, including acute and chronic inflammation. NCI seeks parties to license or co-develop this technology.

Hydrocarbon Stapled Peptides that Inhibit the Linear Ubiquitin Chain Assembly Complex (LUBAC) for the Therapy of the Activated B Cell-like (ABC) Subtype of Diffuse Large B Bell Lymphoma (A Type of Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma)

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have developed an invention consisting of hydrocarbon stapled peptides that disrupt the linear ubiquitin-chain assembly complex (LUBAC), which is involved in NF-κB signaling. These peptides can be used as a therapeutic in the treatment of the activated B cell-like (ABC) subtype of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL), a type of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, as well as inflammatory diseases. The NCI seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for inhibitors of NF-κB signaling and/or treatment of ABC DLBCL, as well as inflammatory diseases.

MADCO-Accelerated Multidimensional Diffusion MRI

The marginal distribution constrained optimization (MADCO) methodology is disclosed wherein a 2D (or higher-dimensional) spectrum is estimated from initial 1D marginal distribution data. These 1D marginal distributions are used as constraints in the reconstruction of the 2D spectra. MADCO accelerates and improves the reconstruction of multidimensional NMR relaxation/diffusion spectra, making it suitable for MRI applications on a voxel-by-voxel basis by vastly reducing the amount of data acquired and data necessary for creating MRI images.

Peptide Inhibitors for Viral Infections and as Anti-inflammatory Agents

IFN-gamma and IL-10 are cytokine signaling molecules that play fundamental roles in inflammation, cancer growth and autoimmune diseases.  Unfortunately, there are no specific inhibitors of IFN-gamma or IL-10 on the market to date. The National Cancer Institute seeks parties interested in licensing or collaborative research to co-develop selective IL-10 and IFN-gamma peptide inhibitors.

Micro-Dose Calibrator for Pre-clinical Radiotracer Assays

Pre-clinical radiotracer biomedical research involves the use of compounds labeled with radioisotopes, including radio-ligand bio-distribution studies, cell binding studies, immune cell labeling techniques, and α-based therapies. Before this Micro-Dose Calibrator, measurement of pre-clinical level dosage for small animal studies was inaccurate and unreliable. This dose calibrator is a prototype ready for customer testing and scale-up. It is designed to accurately measure radioactive doses in the range of 50 nCi (1.8 kBq) to 100 µCi (3.7 MBq) with 99% precision. The NCI seeks co-development or licensing to commercialize it. Alternative uses will be considered.

Novel Fusion Proteins for HIV Vaccine

The National Cancer Institute’s Cancer and Inflammation Program seeks parties to license gp120 and CD4-induced antibody fusion proteins for use in an HIV vaccine.

Cell Lines Expressing Nuclear and/or Mitochondrial RNAse H1

The National Institute of Child Health & Human Development (NICHD), Program in Genomics of Differentiation, seeks interested parties to further co-develop small molecule inhibitors of RNase H1, especially in regards to genome instability, transcription, and translation.

A peptide hydrogel for use in vascular anastomosis

Surgery specialists from Johns Hopkins University, in collaboration with researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), developed peptide hydrogel compositions and methods to suture blood vessels during microsurgery. The hydrogels particularly benefit surgeons in whole tissue transplant procedures. The NCI seeks co-development research collaborations for further development of this technology.

Methods of analyzing virus-derived therapeutics

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute’s Biopharmaceutical Development Program recently developed massively parallel sequencing methods for virus-derived therapeutics such as viral vaccines and oncolytic immunotherapies, for which the NCI seeks licensees or co-development collaborations.

Polymeric Delivery Platform for Therapeutics

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for a polymeric drug delivery platform that targets scavenger receptor A1 (SR-A1), a receptor highly expressed in macrophages, monocytes, mast cells, dendritic cells (myeloid lineages), and endothelial cells. The platform delivers various immunomodulatory therapeutic cargo including small molecule drugs, therapeutic peptides, and vaccines, to the lymphatic system and myeloid/antigen presenting cell (APC) sub-populations.

Anti-bacterial Treatments Using Peptide-Based Inhibitors of the STAT3-IL10 Pathway

Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious disease that typically affects the lungs. Current therapies include a panel of antibiotics given over a range of 6-9 months. As a result of the expense of treatment, the extended timeframe needed for effective treatment, and the scarcity of medicines in some developing countries, patient compliance with TB treatment is very low and results in multi-drug resistant TB (MDR-TB). There remains a need for a faster, more effective treatment for TB. NCI researchers seek licensing and/or co-development of peptide inhibitors of STAT3 and IL-10 developed to treat bacterial infections such as tuberculosis. See aslo: NIH inventions E-164-2007 and E-167-2010

Interleukin 24 (IL-24) to treat inflammatory diseases

Researchers at the National Eye Institute (NEI) have developed a novel therapeutic strategy of using recombinant IL-24 protein to treat inflammatory diseases that involve the proinflammatory T-helper 17 cell (Th17) response, such as uveitis, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and Crohn’s disease. Researchers at the NEI seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for co-developing this technology as strategic partners or licensing it for commercialization.

Polypeptides for Stimulation of Immune Response (Adjuvants)

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute, Laboratory of Molecular Immunoregulation developed compositions and methods for using HMGN and its derivatives as immunoadjuvants with microbial or tumor antigens.The National Cancer Institute, Laboratory of Molecular Immunoregulation seeks parties interested in licensing or collaborative research to co-develop polypeptides or antagonists for immune response regulation.

Anti-CD133 Monoclonal Antibodies as Cancer Therapeutics

Researchers at NCI developed a rabbit monoclonal antibody that recognizes the marker for CD133 and is useful in pharmacodynamic testing to inform targeted anti-cancer chemotherapy development and clinical monitoring. CD133 is a cell surface glycoprotein used as a marker and expressed in stem cells such as hematopoietic stem cells, endothelial progenitor cells and neural stem cells. The NCI seeks collaborative co-development or licensing partners for this technology.

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