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Showing 1-11 of 11 results found

Processes for Producing and Purifying Nucleic Acid-Containing Compositions

This technology provides improved processes for production and purification of nucleic acid-containing compositions, such as non-naturally occurring viruses, for example, recombinant polioviruses that can be employed as oncolytic agents. Some of the improved processes relate to improved processes for producing viral DNA template.

Methods of analyzing virus-derived therapeutics

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute’s Biopharmaceutical Development Program recently developed massively parallel sequencing methods for virus-derived therapeutics such as viral vaccines and oncolytic immunotherapies, for which the NCI seeks licensees or co-development collaborations.

Clinical Outcome Predictors for Mantle Cell Lymphoma

The invention is a novel methodology for predicting a mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) cancer patient’s survival prognosis. This information is important in helping determine the best course of treatment for the patient.

Non-invasive diagnostic and prognostic assay for early stage lung cancer

NCI scientists developed a method that uses urine samples to detect early-stage cancers and that could supplement low-dose computed tomography (LD-CT) to significantly decrease its expensive false negative/false positive results, and the NCI seeks co-developers or licensees to commercialize this technology.

T Cell Receptors Targeting KRAS Mutants for Cancer Immunotherapy/Adoptive Cell Therapy

Researchers at the National Institutes of Health have identified a collection of TCRs that exclusively recognize the common hotspot driver mutations in KRAS antigen, expressed by a variety of epithelial cancers, including pancreatic, colorectal and lung cancer. The mutated KRAS variants are recognized by the TCRs in the context of specific Class I/Class II HLA alleles. These TCRs can be used for a variety of experimental therapeutic, diagnostic and research applications.

Conserved Elements Vaccine for HIV

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed a DNA vaccine using conserved elements of HIV-1 Gag, administered in a prime-boost vaccination protocol. Two of the HIV Gag CE DNA vectors have been tested in a rhesus macaque model. Priming with the Gag CE vaccine and boosting with full length Gag DNA showed increased immune responses when compared to vaccination with Gag alone. Researchers seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for development this DNA vaccine.

SLCO1B3 Genotyping to Predict a Survival Prognosis of Prostate Cancer

This invention identifies two polymorphic genetic markers in the SLCO1B3 (formerly SLC21A8) gene, called 334T>G and 699G>A, that can be measured in genomic DNA obtained from a blood sample to predict survival from diagnosis of prostate cancer in that individual patient.

Diagnostic Assay for Determining Patient Response to Apoptosis-related Cancer Therapy

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed a multiplex assay to determine the efficacy of apoptosis-related drugs targeting the Bcl2 family of proteins or aid in the selection of cancer patients likely to respond. The NCI seeks partners for co-development or licensees for commercialization of novel immunoassays for determining or predicting patient response to cancer therapy.

T-Cell Therapy Against Patient-Specific Cancer Mutations

Scientists at the National Cancer Institute's Surgery Branch developed a method to identify T cells that specifically recognize immunogenic mutations expressed only by cancer cells. The NCI seeks parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop or license T-cell therapy against cancer mutations.

T-Cell Therapy Against Patient-Specific Cancer Mutations

Scientists at the National Cancer Institute developed a method to identify T cells that specifically recognize immunogenic mutations expressed only by cancer cells. NCI seeks parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop or license T-cell therapy against cancer mutations