You are here

Share:

Search Technologies

Showing 1-20 of 216 results found

RNA/DNA Nanoparticles as Cancer Therapeutics

The technology is directed to the use of single-stranded RNA overhangs or toeholds of varying lengths (< 12 nucleotides) contained in nucleic acid-based nanoparticles which trigger the association of these nanoparticles and activates multiple functionalities such as gene silencing and/or cell-specific targeting. The use of RNA toeholds is superior to that of DNA toeholds in that it allows for smaller nanoparticles (fewer nucleotides for the toeholds) resulting in greater chemical stability, less immunogenic and higher yield of production. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for use of RNA overhangs or toeholds in nucleic acid nanoparticles.

T Cell Receptors Targeting CDKN2A Mutations for Cancer Immunotherapy

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks research co-development partners and/or licensees for a collection of T-cell receptors (TCRs) that specifically target CDKN2A mutations. CDKN2A mutations are present in a myriad of cancers. Therefore, these TCRs may be used for engineering TCR-based therapies with therapeutic potential for a broad cancer patient population.

T Cell Receptors Targeting BRAF V600E Mutation for Cancer Immunotherapy

The NCI seeks parties interested in research co-development and/or licensing of TCRs targeting the BRAF V600E mutation. These TCRs are HLA-A*0301 restricted. The BRAF V600E mutation is common among cancer patients, giving the TCRs broad therapeutic potential in immunotherapy against multiple cancers.

Design and Biological Activity of Novel Stealth Polymeric Lipid Nanoparticles for Enhanced Delivery of Hydrophobic Photodynamic Therapy Drugs

Scientists at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed a novel stealth lipid-based nanoparticle formulation comprising phospholipid, DC8,9PC and a polyethylene glycol-ated (PEGylated) lipid – such as DSPE-PEG2000 – that efficiently package a high amounts of hydrophobic photodynamic drug (PDT) – such as HPPH – in stable vesicles. This HPPH-loaded liposome system demonstrates higher serum stability and ambient temperature stability upon storage. It exhibits increased tumor accumulation and improved animal survival in mice tumor models compared to the formulation in current clinical trials. The NCI seeks co-development partners and/or corporate licensees for the application of the technology as an anti-cancer therapeutic.

Quantitative In Vivo Methods for Measuring Brain Networks

Researchers at the NICHD seek licensing and/or co-development research collaborations for a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) method to quantitatively measure in vivo the estimated conduction time of nerve impulses in the brain.

High Efficacy Vaccine and Microbicide Combination For Use Against HIV

The development of a vaccine against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) would be expected to provide long-lasting protection. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed a high efficacy vaccine and microbicide combination for use in an improved HIV vaccine regimen.

Small Molecule Inhibitors of Drug Resistant Forms of HIV-1 Integrase

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute discovered small-molecule compounds whose activity against HIV-1 integrase mutants confer greater resistance than currently approved INSTIs. Preliminary DMPK and ADME studies have been completed by the NCI researchers. The National Cancer Institute seeks partners to commercialize this class of compounds through licensing or co-development.

Multifunctional RNA Nanoparticles as Cancer and HIV Therapeutics

The promise of RNA interference based therapeutics is made evident by the recent surge of biotechnological drug companies that pursue such therapies and their progression into human clinical trials. The present technology discloses novel RNA  and RNA/DNA nanoparticles including multiple siRNAs, RNA aptamers, fluorescent dyes, and proteins. The National Cancer Institute sees parties interested licensing this technology  or in collaborative research to co-develop RNAi-based nanoparticle therapeutics for cancer and HIV.

Assay to Screen Anti-metastatic Drugs

The National Cancer Institute seeks licensees for a model used to study molecular mechanisms and/or signaling pathways involved in tumorigenesis, angiogenesis and metastasis of breast cancer and its response to therapy.

PIM-Targeted PROTACs

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) seeks research co-development partners and/or licensees for a series of PIM Kinase targeting PROTACS.

Novel Fixative for Improved Biomolecule Quality from Paraffin-Embedded Tissue

Researchers in the National Cancer Institute’s Laboratory of Pathology have developed an improved tissue fixative solution that is formaldehyde-free. This novel fixative, BE70, significantly improves DNA, RNA, and protein biomolecule integrity in histological samples compared to traditional fixatives. Additionally, BE70 is compatible with current protocols and does not alter tissue processing. NCI seeks partners to license this technology.

Virus-Like Particles That Can Deliver Proteins and RNA

The present invention describes novel virus-like particles (VLPs) that are capable of binding to and replicating within a target mammalian cell, including human cells. The claimed VLPs are safer than viral delivery because they are incapable of re-infecting target cells. The National Cancer Institute's Protein Expression Laboratory seeks parties interested in licensing the novel delivery of RNA to mammalian cells using virus-like particles.

Pages